• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

In conclusion, I think that cross-cultural studies into gender differences has certainly provided a lot of evidence over the years to show that gender differences are a socially shaped. Traditions and values certainly shape cultural ideas

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Tutor-marked Assignment C Question 1 a) The term androgyny is the meaning for a person who uses both male and female characteristics. b) Content analysis is the analysing of different communications and the sort of message they're giving out. An example of this is a study of British TV adverts conducted by Manstead and McCulloch in 1981. They found evidence that stereo-typing of the male and female role was significant and that because of this, the adverts are likely to play an active part in shaping cultural attitudes towards women. c) One study in which the experimental method was used was by Money & Erhardt (1972). They were interested in seeing whether a boy who's identity had been changed would develop as a biological male or, because of his new identity, a male. ...read more.

Middle

d) The use of cross-cultural research to investigate gender differences is essentially to point the differences in cultures by environmental factors, shaping the development of gender identity. Mead (1935) conducted a study of three societies to see whether there were differences in gender roles looking at the nature vs. nurture idea. She went to New Guinea for six months to study 'The Arapesh' who lived in the mountains, 'The Mundugamor' who lived by the riverside and 'The Tchambuli' who lived on the lakeside. She wasn't campring the differences between the three groups, but the differences of their culture compared to traditional Western culture. Her results showed that The Arapesh showed that there were similarities between themselves and Western society, although they were more interested in the community than reaching their own individual targets. ...read more.

Conclusion

recognised all of these problems and went to do the same study that Mead had done over 50 years before them. They went to the Tchambuli and recognised that women didn't diominate men, nor did men dominate women. They believed that Mead being a women and experiencing what she may have thought 'unfair' at the time in 1930's Western culture, may have changed her idea of what she was observing. Despite the flaws, this was still a great study that used cross-cultural research to investigate gender differences. In conclusion, I think that cross-cultural studies into gender differences has certainly provided a lot of evidence over the years to show that gender differences are a socially shaped. Traditions and values certainly shape cultural ideas, but maybe due to the nature of evolution, what might appear to be social to us, may now be biological within our bodies, so it would be harder for us to change our ways that we live. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Sociology section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Sociology essays

  1. How does Willy Russell use his characters to show social differences?

    working class mother as she depends on her job for the money. Russell then introduces the milkman, the finance man and the catalogue man, who he also uses to show Mrs Johnstone's social background. The milkman makes Mrs Johnstone feel humiliated as he refers to the troubled circumstances she has got herself into.

  2. Gender is determined by society, forming a self-concept whether we are male or female ...

    Only by contrast to others can an individual's score have any meaning. Students, mostly between the ages of 16 and 21 were used; 444 male and 279 female students from Stanford University, and 117 male and 77 female students from Foothill Junior college.

  1. Theories of Sex and Gender

    LYTTON & ROMNEY, (1991, as cited in HARALAMBOS et al, 2002). However, evidence from non-conventional families suggests this is not so. PATTERSON, (1992, as cited in HARALAMBOS et al, 2002), argued that children reared in gay or lesbian families show few differences in gender role development to children of heterosexual parents.

  2. Unraveling of cultural meaning and sociological dimensions of Sex and the City by means ...

    Paglia's comments underscore the feminist refusal of a fixed and static ideological premise. In 1985, for example, two anti-porn feminist activists, Catherine MacKinnon and Andrea Dworkin (cited in Califia 1994, p.

  1. In what ways is the concept of gender useful in the study of ancient ...

    of studying it in ancient history, as it gives us a fuller picture of ancient Greek society. Furthermore, the perception of the sexes can be seen to vary vastly, Xenophon highlights this in his 'Oikonomikos', when he determines that men were built for war because their bodies could endure toil

  2. Evaluate competing ideas on the effects of deprivation on a child during their early ...

    It was in 1970 that the mother escaped the house and took Genie with her. A social worker noticed Genie and she was placed in the rehabilitation ward of a hospital. A psychiatrist described her as "unsocialised, primitive, and hardly human".

  1. Cultural Analysis of a Person: can we read people as cultural texts

    buy shows how much labour you produce and therefore what status you belong to.' Now it isn't Sarah's labour that is buying the house, but it is her parents labour, and I believe that according to this theory the representation of status or labour that buying a house would give Sarah's parents, is inseparable form her own status.

  2. All societies and cultures place a great emphasis on the differences between males and ...

    All cultures have acceptable roles based on the sex of the individual and these roles are determined by a person's position within their family and society. Many argue that gender roles are culturally rather than biologically produced and whiles a person's sex refers to biological differences between male and females,

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work