• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

major theoretical perspectives on socil stratification

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Major theoretical perspectives on social stratification Marxists, Weberians and functionalists all have different theoretical perspectives on class and social stratification. This essay will establish and evaluate their major similarities and differences. It will discuss the main theories, their strengths and weaknesses, their usefulness and how true they are to today's society. Functionalists split class into a number of layers, based upon economic achievement such as occupation. So according to functionalists a company director would be of a higher class layer than that of a plumber. This is a good way to determine class as it is very simple and obvious, however not as good as many people believe, as do Weberists, there are a lot more factors to take into account. According to functionalists society is layered due to unequal rewards being given for different jobs. They believe that this layering is essential in society, as otherwise everybody would choose to do the easiest unskilled jobs and nobody would train for the more difficult ones, as the money is the same either way. ...read more.

Middle

This is relatively true to life as the business owners do tend to lead a completely different, separate life than that of the workers. However this is not so true to life, as Marxists believe that it is very difficult for somebody of the proletariat to change class as they have very little to give, other than their labour, which the bourgeoisie exploit. This is very different from the functionalist view which is that everybody as equal opportunity to succeed in life. Marx's view is more true to life as a lot of people do not have the money in the first place to pay for the training required if they are to succeed. However the functionalist view is also true as there is a lot of financial help and support available in today's society making succeeding more possible. Marx believed that capitalist society would eventually lead to a revolution resulting is a communist society. ...read more.

Conclusion

The functionalist view mentions that there are an unlimited number of levels in today's society; this can be seen as being true to life today as there are so many different people doing different things that could make them of a slightly higher or lower position then someone else. However with Marx's view there is no question about what class somebody would be in, it simply breaks class in two easy parts. Marx believed that in a communist society it would be fairer as everybody would be equal. However this view is not good as certain essential roles would not be filled. Social stratification is good as it allows various roles to be filled and also gives people something to aim for; functionalists believe everybody has an equal opportunity. However social stratification is not good as is causes inequality which may result in higher crime and social marginalization. Therefore functionalism is the most true to today's world. Paul Gilbert ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Sociology section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Sociology essays

  1. Compare and Contrast Marx and Weber's view on Stratification

    Social stratification is not merely a matter of class. Two further aspects also shape it: status and party. These three overlapping elements of stratification produce a vast number of potential positions within society, rather than the more rigid bipolar model, which Marx projected. According to Weber, social divisions derive not only from control or lack of control of the

  2. Different Sociological Perspectives on Crime

    Due to the moral panic different approaches were brought in by the police and the courts. It also contributed to the passing of the Malicious Damage Act. Ultimately a process of 'de-amplification' took place, this meant the media and public interest decline.

  1. Gender as a form of Social Stratification.

    This model of reality has forced students to internalise the need to get a university education so that as workers they can exercise more choice over their livelihood - education is heavily linked to future pay packets. I Although it's fairly clear (from writers such as Mead and Oakley)

  2. What are the major dimensions of social stratification?

    Therefore it can be said that those at the top are considered to be superior to those at the bottom. One can note that in most systems of stratification, the group occupying the higher stratum tent to have a smaller population that those at the bottom.

  1. Social stratification.

    This meant people from lower estates were legally obliged to do certain things for owners of higher estates for example work on their land at least one day per week. The feudal system had little or no social mobility, as it was very difficult for a person to move from one estate to another.

  2. Max Weber: Basic Terms (The Fundamental Concepts of Sociology)

    Members of the group are now treated as subjects. A patrimonial retainer can be supported by: maintenance at his lords table, by allowances from the chief (primarily in kind), by rights of land use in return for services, by appropriation of property income, fees, or taxes, by fiefs. Charismatic Authority The basis for obedience lies in the conception that

  1. This essay will explain the functionalist, Marxist and Social action theories of race and ...

    This significantly contributes to poor health among immigrants who in all four countries studied are more susceptible than their indigenous peers, to poverty-associated illnesses such as Tuberculosis, rickets and asthma. (Race section 8 Handout page 305) Castles and Kosack argue that immigrants do typically live in impoverished conditions, affected by

  2. Social Stratification.

    Fertility refers to how many live born children the average women will have. Fecundity is the numbers of children women are able to have in biological terms. It is physically possible for a normal woman to bear a child every year during the period when she is capable of conception.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work