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On personal experience and social context.

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Introduction

"On personal experience and social context." WW. # 4. By: Mebratu K. Gebru - 992640255. Submitted to: Prof. Marilyn Legge and TA Jennifer Janzen-Ball. Submitted on: Oct. 14/ 2003. As the saying goes: "no one is an island, entire of himself." Since our coming to this world all of us have had interactions first with our families and then with our own society. Family, the first school, serves as a shaper of everyone's moral sensibilities. Though intellectual influence is preserved for schools, they themselves have their own moral influence. "As our lives are irreducibly social," (Birch and Rasmussen, 85) the interactions that we have among our society also contribute for the kind of personality that we are. Based on the assigned readings and the writer's personal experience, this paper briefly deals with the place of moral issues in social life, the role of personal experience in responding to the moral issues of one's own society, and the religious influences on public affairs. ...read more.

Middle

In sum, based on their own experience people act differently, and have a varied understanding of moral issues like sexual orientation, marriage, euthanasia et al. Religious traditions play a significant role in the broader moral issues of a given society (FCTW, 372). As Hauerwas infers, despite the philosophical doubt, there is an assumption among many that religion is closely related to morality, and strong interdependence exists between religion and morality (FCTW, 131). Such a fact, however, should not be suspected, since any religious tradition has its own moral values that greatly contribute to the norms of any society, exerting their own influence. This is mainly true in societies whose cultural traits are integrated with religious values, though the moral influence of religions over cultures like the Western ones may not be strong. But as morality, which is the essence of every religion, cannot be wholly discarded by any society, wherever there is a good social order, the moral effects of religions is paramount. ...read more.

Conclusion

His love is perfect, unconditional and sacrificial. We read in the Bible that while we were the enemies of God, He reconciled Himself to us sending His beloved Son (Rom 5:10). Also the Son loved us in a kind of love no one can have greater than that (Jn 15: 13). As an expression of His unfathomable love, He prayed for those who crucified him (Lk 23:34). I think, any Christian is supposed to imitate Christ, bringing such kind of love to his/her society. Displaying a special kind of patience, strange to the world where people use others for their ends, Christians love their enemies and pray for those who persecute them. They do not resist an evil act replying evilly; rather they overcome it by the work of love. Moreover, they contribute for the good of their society, and also they are reliable enough in undertaking their responsibilities. Briefly for me, to be a Christian in the strictest sense means to be a good citizen. A genuine Christian, as an activist can immensely contribute to his country in general, and to his society as a social reformer in particular. 1 1 ...read more.

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