• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Outline Marx's view of class in capitalist society, and explain what you see as the major problems with this approach?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Outline Marx's view of class in capitalist society, and explain what you see as the major problems with this approach? Marx analyzed class in relation to the ownership of capital and the means of production. He divided the population into those who owned property and those who were propertyless, the capitalist class and the proletariat. He recognised the existence of groups that did not fit this framework e.g. peasants but suggested that these were hangovers of the pre-capitalist economy that would vanish with the maturation of the capitalist system. Class was more than just a way of describing the economic position of different groups. Marx saw class as tangible collectivities and as real social forces with the capacity to change society. However criticism refers to social class as no longer being relevant to the understanding of modern societies. Jorgensen, (1997) suggests Marx saw the origins of a class society rooted in the change of agriculture. The earliest forms of society Marx refers to as a "primitive communism" where nobody owned property and the land belonged to everyone. "From each according to his ability, to each according to his needs", The Communist Manifesto, (1848). The beginnings of a class system occurred with the development of sophisticated agricultural techniques. The notion of communal land changed and property boundaries were marked. Some people became more powerful than others did by acquiring and controlling the land. From this an increasingly powerful few owned the land and property and the rest worked for them. ...read more.

Middle

Gidden's suggests that this view underlies the assumption that classes are mere inequalities in the distribution of income and that class conflict can be "alleviated or eliminated" by the introduction of measures which minimise the differences between incomes. According to Hughes et al, (1995), Marx retained his firm belief that class played a major role in the transformation of capitalism. In pre-capitalist production, producers would bring goods to the market, sell their goods for money and buy other goods to sustain themselves and their families. Money would not function as capital but be a means of exchanging commodities of equivalent values. However, Marx argued that in capitalist production, the general relationship between money and commodities differs. The capitalists use money to produce commodities and the commodities are then sold at a profit to produce more money. However, according to Hughes et al, (1995), capitalists are drawn into two fundamental conflicts, competition from other capitalists and unavoidable conflict with the workers. Craib (1997) suggests that Marx spoke little about social class but that when he did he referred to social groups as being classes, concentrating on only two social classes. The significance of social class is still debated. It is sometimes suggested that class has no relevance to everyday life in contemporary society and ethnicity, gender or other factors have replaced it. Craib, (1997), suggests that Marx's analyses of class and class structure is useful but recognizes a problem understanding why conflict does not occur as indicated from Marxist analysis. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, Bradley, (1996), criticises Marx for his failure to perceive the growing social and economic significance of new middle class, instead Marx concentrates on the relationship between capital and labour. Overall Bradley notes that the Marxist theory is useful but that insufficient attention is paid to other social grouping for example the unemployed and that Marx does not take into account gender or race and ethnicity. Also Marx's notion of class struggle and social revolution has been rejected by Weberians. Weber believed that social revolution would be an unlikely outcome and if did occur would not improve ordinary citizens lives but add to bureaucracy and tyranny. Weber also didn't feel it was a simple matter of one class in conflict with another, but that it would be more complex, with conflicts occurring within classes as well as between them. The "post-industrial" and "postmodern" frameworks inspire new approaches to class and criticise the Marxist Class theory. Bell, (1974), suggests that technological change would lead to the upgrading of the occupational structure. A new technical and professional elite would emerge, replacing the propertied capitalist class. Bell, (1974), suggests the general prosperity would be brought by post-industrial change and would mean that remaining manual workers would experience better working conditions, an increased standard of living and enhanced leisure time. Bell contradicts Marx's theory of "proletarianization and revolution". Postmodernism offers a more flexible approach moving the analysis of class to a broader framework dealing with its relation to other aspects of inequality, gender, race and age. However it still has traces of the frameworks of industrialization and capitalism from which it evolved. It still remains "economistic" and prefers to use an occupational definition of class. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Sociology section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Sociology essays

  1. Mateship has long been a major aspect of the national image as projected by ...

    The Union Australian unionism has its origin in 1855. One of its major aims is to protect Australian workers from the oppression and exploitation of the unjust employers. What is more important here, however, is that unionism played a very significant role in the development and entrenchment of Australian mateship, and these two factors are reciprocal.

  2. Social Class.

    more likely to reach the cervical cytology targets set out in the GP contract. Sub-regional and small area analyses illustrate this inequity for areas such as Liverpool and Birmingham where, using nine indicators of primary care services, the most deprived areas tended to be the least well served.

  1. What are the major dimensions of social stratification?

    share a similar lifestyle, live in the same neighbourhood, attend the same church or go to the same country club. Those that do not meet these types of criteria are excluded from the group even though they may be in the same income bracket as the members of the group.

  2. Are issues of Social Class still relevant in modern society?

    In an attempt to compensate for children thought to be at a disadvantage due to social 'class', measures were adopted by the government, to redress the imbalance of educational attainment. Following a report by the government advisory committee in 1967 (The Plowden Committee), extra teachers and additional money for facilities

  1. In what ways does "Modern times" capture the main features of an industrial capitalist ...

    the assembly line as if the employee wasn't fast enough then the line would stop and s so created workers alienance, was this because of the means in which society changes the social means of subsistence in order to exploit labour for capital.

  2. Why is there unequal division of household labour in most of the society?

    The following three approaches can provide a more in depth explanation to account for such persistent pattern of unequal household division pattern between men and women. "The emergence of capitalism with the related rise of mercantilism, industrialization, and a cash-based economy, eroded the position of women by shifting the centre of production form the domestic until to the public workplace.

  1. The essay will interpret inequalities in health among the sub-populations of socio-economic class position, ...

    die younger...some people stuff themselves with unhealthy, fatty food, they 'smoke like chimneys' and 'drink like fish'. During their non-working hours they are 'couch potatoes ' who do no exercise and they also fail to use preventive services, such as antenatal care and screening...the range of unhealthy behaviour could be

  2. Gender as a form of Social Stratification.

    This inequality between groups is further understood if we understand that education has increasingly been linked to the demands of the economy so that subjects like science are valued over the creative subjects such as art or literature. Non-white people have historically been looked upon by white people as a

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work