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Perhaps the biggest cause of problems in the modern world is the failure of society to keep pace with, and control of, science and technology. Discuss this assertion.

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Introduction

Science, Technology & Society ESSAY TITLE: Perhaps the biggest cause of problems in the modern world is the failure of society to keep pace with, and control of, science and technology. Discuss this assertion. Since the beginning of human life, science and technology was, is and will be side by side with man and mankind. Even from the simplest discoveries that helped mankind, anyone could see that mankind depends so much on science and technology that these days are almost impossible to know a fold of life that has nothing to do with them. However in this relationship, as in all relationships and kinds of them, there are some advantages and disadvantages. One major disadvantage is the failure of society to keep pace with, and control of, science and technology. Mankind has been evolved so much that people do not know what to expect next. What will be the next great discovery or innovation of science and technology that will amaze us? However all these discoveries and innovations have a price which grows bigger day by day. The price is the constant remotion of the ordinary people from all these technologies, which is used by an 'elite' which can understand the functions of technology or they have the knowledge to use all these technologies. ...read more.

Middle

But political choices fail down to unravel how a larger political interest can be of any help to the implementation of scientific method. Science sometimes feels repressed because it cannot serve its own needs for knowledge and research. As a direct result science cannot fulfil its own needs and goals. For example political interests specify the whole production and where to use this production and for what reasons. Technology has just to cope with it and manage to carry out the instructions of the political realm. So science cannot keep pace with society because society represses it and furthermore they have different goals. Politics make riddle the political morphology, as they want to be in control and ready to preclude the changes that will happen. This kind of politics has as a result the less allowance for the catastrophic implications of the technology in various folds of human life. As a conclusion, politics and society count on technology and especially in their capability to manage the development of technology, for their survival. Politics interfere straightforward in the funding, organisation and priorities of science and technology, as the scientific knowledge is linked to the values and judgements of the politics. ...read more.

Conclusion

To sum up all of the above, science and technology is an inevitable part of the society and society is an evitable part of science and technology. They co-exist and confront each other, because they want something from each other. There is an exchange of resources and operations. However they both are necessary parts of their proper function. For example society may demand useful things that science cannot provide or can but they have no proper use in society's needs. On the other hand, science and technology can provide society rather useful innovations with applications at many aspects of life. Although both of them have different goals and demands from each other, the key for their successful co-existence is somewhere in the middle. So science and technology have to provide society with something useful and practical, under their field of research, and society has to stop to demand the results of the scientific research in a very limited time, because science has to be sure before giving something new to the society. In conclusion, society cannot keep pace with science and technology because of many different reasons. Each one of these reasons contributes to the alienation of society and science and technology. ...read more.

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