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Sociology - Social Inequality

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The social effects of social inequality. Introduction. The name of this coursework will be "The effects of social inequality." As we go about and prosper in our lives, inequality is less evident. Although we live in a modern age where we inhabit a somewhat fair and peaceful democratic country, inequality is still prominent in our society. Those who fail to recognise it are those who are not affected by it, the elite. They who are the ones supplied with the fruits of society and consider other less fortunate people's opinions as inferior to theirs. Social inequality itself exists in all known human societies. The one of the principal concerns of it is to understand how exactly they impact people's lives and to understand these. Social inequality refers to the uneven distribution of: - Resources such as power and money. - Opportunities related to for example to; education, employment and health. Social class, gender, age and ethnicity are all sources of inequality in the UK. In other words, a situation in which certain groups in a society do not have equal social status. Social inequality can be broken down into different parts; income, occupation and education, but primarily its based on social class. Piachaud (2009) argues that the causes of inequality within the UK include large differences between people in terms of inherited wealth, education and access to the labour market. ...read more.

Middle

Throughout this coursework, I then will prove how social class can affect people's lives. This has led me to my hypothesis; "Social inequality is still in existence and effects people's lives." Methodology These research methods I have chosen is adequate to my investigation as my source can easily go through it with varied options also I can to collect large amounts of data. I have chosen in as my primary research methods; a questionnaire and interview. The methods would be going through a questionnaire, and explore and note people's views upon this matter. By choosing an informal type interview, I can get a background idea of what people think without pressurising them into saying their opinion while being still professional. However weaknesses for a questionnaire; it may be ignored or neglected by people. Also it may not always be the truth, especially on sensitive issues, for example, the social issues they may have experienced. Also those who may be impatient may quickly go through it and not get to answer the questions in detail or to show their wider view. Lastly the answers may not contain a participant's view so they would not have a say in that specific question. Despite its flaws, the actual method is quick and simple and gets to the point in a short matter of time hence is then being useful. ...read more.

Conclusion

a) What type of society is Britain today - which is it today: A B C D b) What type of society would you prefer and think should be enforced in Britain? A B C D Interview Questions The questions I have allocated for my interviews will be mostly resemble the questions of the questionnaire however this being an interview, it will enclose the opportunity for the actual interviewee to give a range of reasons why. Firstly I will ask mostly personal questions related to the issue such as age and gender and how they actually recognize the words; social inequality. From there I will then go on to the questions I have chosen for the interview and record related issues and notes; * Do you think the benefit system is a financial safety net for temporarily unemployed citizens? * Do you think the taxing system in Britain today is fair? * In society today, do you think we neglect those who may be less privileged than us? * Do you think the benefit system is a financial safety net for temporarily unemployed citizens? * Do you think that Britain will be equal in terms of equal distribution of power and wealth amongst the citizens? * Do you agree social inequality is still in existence? Analysis ?? ?? ?? ?? Bilal Zulfiqar 11X Sociology Coursework - Mrs Ellison ...read more.

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