• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The Nature of Girls' Crime

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Girls' involvement in delinquency and crime, though still less than boys', appears to have increased significantly in the past two decades. There is, however, little knowledge about the causes of girls' violence, and few studies have been conducted on young women's delinquency and crime. This article reviews current research on girls' violent behavior, the factors contributing to it, and effective programming strategies to prevent it. The Nature of Girls' Crime Although girls are involved in more violent crime than they were a decade ago, violent crimes accounted for only 3.4 percent of girls' arrests in 1994 (Chesney-Lind and Brown, 1999). Part of the increase in their arrest rate for violent crimes may be attributable to changes in the way girls are charged. For example, a girl who shoves her parents in self-defense as she tries to run away is now likely to be arrested for assault, which is a criminal offense; previously, she would have been arrested for the lesser offense of running away (Chesney-Lind and Shelden, 1998). Nonetheless, girls continue to be arrested predominantly for "status" offenses (considered offenses only because the perpetrator is a minor), such as running away or violating curfews (Chesney-Lind and Shelden, 1998). ...read more.

Middle

The increase in female violence was attributed to the perpetrator's renunciation of stereotypically female characteristics and values in favor of the corresponding male characteristics and values. The women's movement, which fostered assertiveness and was said to encourage young women to adopt certain "male behaviors" (drinking, stealing, and fighting), was blamed as well (Adler, 1975). Subsequent research, including data showing that the increase in female crime was really not significant, discredited most of these findings (Chesney-Lind and Shelden, 1998). Current research on adolescent violence and delinquency considers how social class, race, ethnicity, and culture interact to cause young women to behave violently (Chesney-Lind and Shelden, 1998). It also helps explain why girls join gangs, which is to develop skills to survive in their harsh communities and temporarily escape a dismal future (Campbell, 1991; Chesney-Lind, Shelden, and Joe, 1996). Violent young women are more likely than their nonviolent counterparts to come from troubled or violent families. A home life characterized by poverty, divorce, parental death, abandonment, alcoholism, and frequent abuse leaves girls quick to anger, distrust, and exact revenge (Artz, 1998; Koroki and Chesney-Lind, 1985). ...read more.

Conclusion

Unfortunately, funding for programs that address the unique needs of delinquent girls has been low: in 1975, for example, only 25 percent of funds donated by corporations supported programs for girls (Chesney-Lind and Shelden, 1998). A recent review of youth programs showed that only 2.3 percent of delinquency programs specifically served girls. The few existing programs that are effective with at-risk young women share certain elements, including educational and occupational support, a comprehensive counseling component that addresses their unique needs, and provisions for meeting the needs of women who are unable to remain with their families (Chesney-Lind and Shelden, 1998). Effective programs also provide young women with access to caring adults and organized community activities. Finally, because male violence and aggression against young women are often factors in female delinquency and violence, separate intervention programs need to be developed for aggressive and violent men and boys. This would minimize the risk of female victimization and, in turn, reduce the risk of girls' participation in violence. Source Weiler, J. 1999. Girls and Violence. New York: ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education. ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 430 069. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Sociology section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Sociology essays

  1. Sociological investigation into why do girls do better than boys in school.

    I have personally seen it for myself in lessons and also at home. The girls in my lesson's as well as at home tend to work harder in the sense of taking longer on their work than boys.

  2. Is female to male as nature is to culture?

    Callaway cites La Fontaine's (1972) work in the Bugisu region of Uganda where the physical stages in the development of a girl into a woman is marked by rituals overtly expressing the predominance of men. Gisu women are subject to various taboos on the onset of menstruation and there is

  1. To try and find out why girls are outperforming boys in GCSEexaminations?

    'What subjects do you like?' I also asked some more in-depth questions specifically related to my research, such as; 'Do you plan on staying at school for further education?' 'Do you think the school is helping you enough?' 'Do your parents take an interest in your education?'

  2. Why are girls out-performing boys at GCSE

    My pilot study was my friend Louise May, when her test came back and it had performance for a lot of the questions I realised I had to say, if it is to do with performance what might affect it.

  1. Masculinity and Asian gangs

    Gayness, in patriarchal ideology is the repository of whatever is symbolically expelled from hegemonic masculinity (Connell p40:2001). Hegemonic masculinity labels those men who are homosexual or even heterosexual to be not 'men'. Verbal abuse is used to distinguish hegemonic masculinity from feminine or homosexual masculinity such as; Poffs, faggots, wimps, pussy, sissy, candy ass, mothers boy, jellyfish etc (Connell 2001).

  2. Is Delinquency a major factor in youth culture, what theory best explains delinquency?

    however there are two ways f looking at it, you could ask a person when was the last time they saw say a major terrorist act concerning the Taliban before September 11th, especially concerning Britain, in the headlines of the papers.

  1. The Deviant Nature of Obesity.

    Between these stages is societal reaction. In primary deviance, the person violates norms that do not affect self-concept or social role performance. In this stage, the person overeats, but has not yet begun showing signs of being overweight or obese. They do not feel differently about themselves.

  2. James Gilligan's Thesis on Violence

    The two cardinal characteristics of instrumental aggression are goal-directed and planning. The instrumental aggressor acts to obtain a readily apparent goal such as power, money, sexual gratification, or some other objective beyond inflicting injury on the victim. Examples of this would be shooting a police officer in the course of

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work