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The position of widows in Nepalese society - sociological study.

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Introduction

The position of widows in Nepalese society: sociological study Topics covered include grief, bereavement, recovery, and other information helpful to people, of all ages, religious backgrounds and sexual orientations, who have suffered the death of a spouse or life partner. Society expects men to walk tall through their grief, offering little male-related support, say the experts. As a result, widowers often feel isolated in their grief even when friends and family are around. Religion that is pure and undefiled before God is this: To care for orphans and widows in their distress" James 1:27, RSV Long after those words were written, we still don't quite know how to treat our widows. Similarly, a woman in her 70s can find a group that catereds to her life needs. "We're living in an age of specialization," said Mary Keane, of Mary's Place in Windsor, a center for grieving children and families run by Carmon Funeral Homes. Despite the pressure they may put on themselves, Weber said, women of her generation have the advantage of life skills older women may not. They can balance a checkbook. Most have worked outside the home and make a separate income from their partners. They often draw support from other single mothers, divorced or widowed or never married at all. Patriarchy and Marriage Across the cultural diversity, the majority of communities in Nepal are patriarchal´┐Ża woman's life is strongly influenced by her father and husband´┐Żas reflected in the practice of patrilocal residence, patriarchal descent, and by inheritance systems and family choice relations. Such patriarchal practices are further reinforced by the legal system. Marriage has an overwhelming importance woman's life. The event of marriage determines almost all her life options and subsequent livelihood. According to Hindu tradition, marriage is essential for all, whether man or woman. While a man's life is not considered complete without a wife, a woman has no option but to marry. ...read more.

Middle

Discriminatory inheritance and land ownership laws, constraints to remarriage, degrading and often life-harming mourning rites, traditions such as levies on widow-inheritance, and lack of access to credit, training and work are some of the matters requiring immediate attention by governments who have ratified the Convention. This type of human rights abuse is not only most serious and widespread, but also has the gravest consequences for the children of widows, denied health, welfare, education and therefore ill-equipped to contribute to their country's development. Indeed, beyond such human rights issues lay many often profound consequences of such discrimination. One of these is of direct relevance to population growth. Fear of an unsupported widowhood is often so great that women feel a need to have many children to ensure that there are adult sons to look after them in old age. One widowed mother of 12 children explained her reluctance to use family planning methods: "It could get rid of the one good son who would care for you". Family Planning programmes might have greater success if social and economic policies were shaped to improve the widow's status. The neglect of female children is another relevant issue. Studies in India have shown that the desire to have at least one adult son is much greater among women than among women. In widows families, as much as in all poor families, girl children risk neglect in favour of their brothers. The poor Indian widow weeps when her husband dies not just for herself but for the dowryless daughters who must be married off as soon as possible, often to older men, so that they in turn become young and "inauspicious" widows themselves. In Africa, education is the first expense to be scrapped when a woman loses the male breadwinner. Education is expensive. Sons take priority over daughters. And there are other cultural reasons why widows tend to keep their daughters at home. ...read more.

Conclusion

of widows' profile; need for follow up and vocational training for illiterate and poor widows, and coordinating the efforts of government with the heads of religious institutions and voluntary organization in changing the attitudes of the people according to the changing times and needs of society." No. 15278 thesis hindu widow remarriage act 1866 came in India to provide a legal right of widows marriage and legacy right to their children. In Nepal, the Civil Code 2020 has given right to widow remarriage. Presently, early aged widows is gradually decreasing, mainly due to the improvement in health facilities, increase in age of marriage and lesser age gaps of married couples. Similarly, there was a practice of child marriages in the past( and in most urban areas presently also). Compared to males, females were married at an early age. Early marriages, especially for females, were guided by religious dogmas. " a father should give his daughter before she reaches puberty, that is before her menustrate period. If a father does not give his daughter before her first menustral cycle, the ancestors will drink the monthly menustral blood. According to the Smriti Puran, following is the list of girls age that are categorized in accordance with the priorities given in marriages: a) "Nagnika" or naked, i.e. a period before girls breasts emerge b) "Gauri" or eight year old girl c) "Rohini" or nine year old girl d) "Kanya" or the ten year old girl e) "Rajaswala" or the girl above 10 years of age. Discriminatory inheritance and land ownership laws, constraints to remarriage, degrading and often life-harming mourning rites, traditions such as levies on widow-inheritance, and lack of access to credit, training and work are some of the matters requiring immediate attention by governments who have ratified the Convention. This type of human rights abuse is not only most serious and widespread, but also has the gravest consequences for the children of widows, denied health, welfare, education and therefore ill-equipped to contribute to their country's development. ...read more.

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