• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Why are we learning the material that we are learning?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Why are we learning the material that we are learning? Learning a variety of different subjects in school, falling under such categories as the sciences, humanitarian, linguistics, the arts and otherwise, it is often lingering in a student's mind how exactly this seemingly irrelevant information could possibly be beneficial later on in life. Although I am myself prone to this thought more often than I'd like to admit, looking at education from a broader, more objective standpoint, there are very valuable reasons to why exactly education is important to us, even when we fail to realise it. On the most basic level, we learn as young children to speak, read, write and tackle simple maths problems in order to communicate. Maths and sciences make up a large part of the academic curriculum for many students; it is four out of nine GCSE's for me personally. Subjects such as chemistry, physics, biology and maths are valuable in that they help us to understand the physical workings of the world and answer some very basic questions of 'How?' and 'Why?'. In order to understand the mechanics of the world in which we reside, we need to turn to the knowledge of scientists, doctors, inventors of the past and their theories. Biology (and also chemistry to some extent) ...read more.

Middle

Being in a foreign country and knowing the language is always helpful. Not only that, but it allows us to communicate to a wider range of people; to connect and understand people from different backgrounds, religions and races. This encourages us become more respectful and tolerant of all those around us. To explore these cultures and the world around us in even more depth there are the humanitarian subjects, such as History and Geography (the only two that are available in school at the moment). These subjects allow us to delve into the past and learn about past civilisations or situations. For example, in History, studying different cultures, their customs of living and structures of society allows us to pinpoint their mistakes and their successes and to learn from both. Studying different social or political trends demonstrates to us which structures work and which do not. In theory a principal may work well but in reality it can have unforeseen consequences. Knowing about ancient civilisations and world wars allows us (as a society) not to make the same mistakes again. If we knew nothing about what happened in history, then we would inevitably make the same mistakes again and again. We cannot look into the future, but there is nothing to stop us from learning from the past. ...read more.

Conclusion

Through learning a variety of these subjects we are able to learn more about the world in which we live and about ourselves. Perhaps this can lead to answers to as to why there are so many problems, be it social, economic, political or otherwise in the world. Although not every student who learns about Mozart will become a musical genius, it is not invaluable for an artist to know about the world wars, neither is it invaluable for a doctor to appreciate to appreciate the work of Dali nor a mechanic to be aware of the ideals of Communism. Given the basic fundamentals to work with, it is obviously up to us to apply these facts we have learnt to practical situations. But without these foundations that education provides us, we would be left without thousands, even millions of years of knowledge that has been accumulated over the ages. In addition to this, although at the end of the day memorising formulas or the properties of rocks may not be immediately beneficial, becoming a doctor and saving someone's life or building a self-sustainable community in a developing country is extremely valuable. It is the continual and gradual build up of this knowledge that is valuable. Small disjointed pieces of information may be unhelpful, but it is the accumulation of these facts that matter. Ultimately I think that education, hopefully, helps us to be a little less ignorant and a little more aware about the world in which we live and about ourselves. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Sociology section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Sociology essays

  1. Max Weber: Basic Terms (The Fundamental Concepts of Sociology)

    Members of the group are now treated as subjects. A patrimonial retainer can be supported by: maintenance at his lords table, by allowances from the chief (primarily in kind), by rights of land use in return for services, by appropriation of property income, fees, or taxes, by fiefs. Charismatic Authority The basis for obedience lies in the conception that

  2. The Hidden Curriculum; Hegemony and Capitalism.

    The superstructure consists of the legal, political, religious, intellectual forms through which life is known and lived, schools are a part of this superstructure. The institutions we build, the philosophies we adhere to, the prevailing ideas of the time, the culture of society, are all determined to some extent or another by the economic structure of society.

  1. Environmental Lessons From History.

    The figures had always stood facing inland but up till that time no traveller to the land had ever mentioned anything about their gaze. In fact in 1780 the French Comte de la Perouse, who visited the island in that year, had commented in his journal about the apparently sightless nature of the giants (Orliac and Orliac, 1995).

  2. 'The Simple Bard, unbroke by rules or Art'. (Burns epigraph to the Kilmarnockedition). How ...

    The bard is a figure of passion, honesty and integrity, a peasant who is riling against those armed classes, who breech the peripheries of his idyll, in the song 'Westlin Winds' (p. 153). Burns cultivation of the bardic persona is therefore given absolute authority in his themes.

  1. Do you get it? If not youll want to - Salvador ...

    When he was in school he refused to be examined during tests, saying that he was more qualified than anyone administering the tests. Dali was removed from school by his father, however encouraged to continue painting by his family, who built him a studio in their summer house.

  2. Amsterdam Mini Cruise £50 Return

    Drug users exercise free will when they chose to use drugs; a person has the right to give up his or her own freedom. No drug eliminates free will. It is possible to quit using any drug. Many banned drugs are significantly less deleterious to free will than legal alcohol or tobacco.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work