• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Write about a selection of Saki's stories. What impression do they create of the world of adult-child relationships?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Write about a selection of Saki's stories. What impression do they create of the world of adult-child relationships? In order to answer this question I am going to be focusing on three of Saki's stories; the story-teller, the lumber room and the open window. Children at the time Hector Munro (Saki) was writing these stories would have had very vivid imagination; this is shown in Saki's story "The Open Window" when the niece makes up the saga of Mr Sappleton's death, illustrates how imaginative children can be, and that adults are very easily fooled. Fooling adults is a key theme in Saki's stories; another time when it occurs is in the story "The Lumber Room" when Nicholas dupes his aunt into believing that he is ...read more.

Middle

Again these also relates to the theme of children being able to fool adults, because they are seen as innocent. I am now going to write about the characters in Saki's stories. Each story contains an Aunt, who is perceived a strict and a person who follows the rules of Edwardian society very closely, and children, who tend to break the regulations that Edwardian society has, and by some other characters, like the Batchelor in the story "The Story-Teller" and Mr Nuttel in the story "The Open Window" Firstly I am going to concentrate on the Bachelor in "The Story-Teller". He is different to the rest of the adults in the early stories because he tells the children a story about a young girl is "horribly good". ...read more.

Conclusion

Saki has invented the character of the Bachelor in order to help him to ridicule Edwardian society. An example of the Bachelor ridiculing Edwardian society is when he comments on the aunts appalling attempt to tell a story - this would have been frown upon especially because he is not related to the family in any way. The Aunts in these stories are exact models of how adults in Edwardian society should behave. This is shown throughout Saki's stories, but is more prominent in the open window when the aunt starts moaning about how much mess her husband will make all over her "fine carpets". This shows that she is very house-proud, like an Edwardian wife should be, and that she probably spends most of her time cleaning, cooking and washing. ?? ?? ?? ?? 507 Words Stuart Birse 10R (Page1) ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Sociology section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Sociology essays

  1. The Go-between, while a powerful story of a young boy’s premature involvement in an ...

    "...the stately ample figure of Mrs. Mausdley at one end of the table and the thin figure of her husband...She always seemed to take up more space than was necessary to her, and he less..." We see here that the dominance of social class is suggested through the description of Mrs.

  2. The Mood of Edwardian High Society.

    The Lost Golden Age - The Edwardians It is this image of apparent splendour, extravagance and excess that lingers on, and which prompted J. B. Priestley to describe the era as:- ' the lost golden age...... all the more radiant because it is on the other side of the huge black pit of war.'

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work