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You Can Have It

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Introduction

Philip Levine writes as though he is from a hard working middle class family geared toward the more highly educated class. Levine directs his poetry towards the higher class, through personal relationships and by showing pride and respectability in manual labor. Levine wants the more educated to know that even though the lower class may not have the most respectable jobs, they still take pride in their work because it supports their family. By using personal relationships, Levine emphasizes the how much pride the working class takes in their jobs. Levine writes as though he is from a hard working middle class family, who works day after day just to make it through life and support the family. Although he is writing from this prospective, his work is actually geared more toward a more highly educated group. Levine wants the higher class to know just how lucky they are. Most people of high stature have never really had a hard manual-laboring job. ...read more.

Middle

The father after seeing the child and the beautiful things that he works for, he can proudly answer that he is happy with a head nod, "Yes! oh yes! oh yes!" He is proud to work hard to support his family. Every child looks up to its parents. In the beginning of this poem the son seems to be timid about bothering his father while he is relaxing but by the end, the son feels right at his fathers level "among the stars." He is proud to have his father and know that he is an honest hard working man and looks up to him as if he were a the brightest of all stars. The poem You Can Have It also describes the pride that another man takes in his job even if it is only in a factory. In the third stanza of the poem Levine talks about a man and his brother saying that "they are only one man/ sharing a heart that always labors, hands/ yellowed and cracked." ...read more.

Conclusion

After a long day of hard work, the father finds an escape in returning to his family and being away from his job. Just holding his son up there with him for that one minute gives him a sense of happiness and helps him to forget all the troubles of that day. Seeing his son happy and admiring him so much makes the father feel a sense of worth and pride in his job. Philip Levine writes as though he is from a hard working middle class family who works very hard just to make it through life and support the family. He wants the higher class to know how lucky they are and what struggles the less educated go through. In all of the poems, the narrator is proud of his work no matter what job he has, even if it is only in a factory. By using personal relationships throughout his poems, Levine highlights the fact that all the people take pride in their work. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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