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Bio Lab Design

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Introduction

Question How does the pace of a run affect the breathing rate per minute after a two minute run? Problem statement The purpose of this lab is to decipher if a runner's breathing rate will increase, decrease, or remain the same according to the pace the runner sets. The independent variable is the pace; the runner will run at 12 minutes per mile, 10 minutes per mile then 8 minutes per mile. The dependent variable is how many times the runner breathes per minute directly after the run. The constants of this experiment are the subject, the environment and the length of time running. In order to keep these variables constant, the subject will run on a treadmill. This will keep the three different paces constant along with the amount of time running and the surface of the area being run on will not change. Also the treadmill is indoors with the air temperature staying at a consistent level. ...read more.

Middle

Procedure 1. Begin the process by measuring the breathing rate of the subject at rest. 2. To do this, count the number of times the subject exhales per minute for a total of three minutes. 3. Record each measurement per minute. 4. Set the treadmill to move at the pace of 12 minutes per mile. 5. Start the timer at two minutes once the subject begins running. 6. Once the two minutes of running is completed, stop the treadmill and immediately start counting the number of times the subject exhales per minute for a total of three minutes. 7. Record these three measurements. 8. After the three minutes of measuring the subject's breathing rate are over, allow the subject to rest for five minutes or until the breathing rate is at the same rate as the initial resting rate. 9. Once the subject's breathing rate is back to the rate it was at rest, repeat steps 4-8 for two more trials. ...read more.

Conclusion

18. Once the two minutes of running is completed, stop the treadmill and immediately start counting the number of times the subject exhales per minute for a total of three minutes. 19. Record these three measurements. 20. After the three minutes of measuring the subject's breathing rate are over, allow the subject to rest for five minutes or until the breathing rate is at the same rate as the initial resting rate. 21. Once the subject's breathing rate is back to the rate it was at rest, repeat steps 4-8 for two more trials. 22. Record all the measurements collected. 23. Then for the 12 minute mile pace, find the average of all the measurements taken after the first minute of all three trials, then do the same for the measurements collected after the second minute, then do the same for the third minute. 24. Repeat these calculations for the 10 minute and 8 minute mile pace. 25. Then use these averages to compare to the initial breathing rate to see how it changed, if it did, due to the increase of the speed of the run. ...read more.

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