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Lung Capacity Fitness Level

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

High Level Biology Human Physiology 1 Digestive or Respiratory System Open Investigation Will increasing levels of fitness enable one to have larger vital lung capacity? DESIGN Background Information Notice how short distance professional swimmers, for example, a 50m freestyle swimmer, breathe only once or twice throughout the whole course. Why is it that it is nearly impossible for normal recreational swimmer to do that? If a person's lung size cannot increase, how is it possible for professional swimmers to have such large lung capacity thereby able to hold large amount of air? The answer has to do with fitness level and exercise. Breathing comprises of two actions, inspiration and expiration. Breathing is one of the required bodily functions of human beings. Our lungs deliver oxygen breathed in (inspire) from our surrounding air into the blood inside our body, and contrary exhale (expire) carbon dioxide out of the body. When inspiration occurs, the diaphragm and the intercostal muscles contract and causes the diaphragm to move downwards, increasing the volume of the chest cavity. The intercostals muscles also causes the rib cage to expand, further increasing the volume. Contrary to inspiration, expiration causes the diaphragm and intercostal muscles to relax therefore the thoracic cavity returns to its original volume, increasing the air pressure in the lungs and forcing carbon dioxide to be released from the body. [4] Diagram 1.0: The act of Inspiration and Expiration [6] We know that our lungs respond to our body's changing needs for oxygen. We breathe deeper and take faster breaths when our body is associated with vigorous exercise. Our lungs are the organs that perform all our critical breathing functions. As mentioned before, professional athletes attain a larger lung capacity than normal people. Lung vital capacity is the maximum volume of air that can be forcefully exhaled and inhaled in one breath. [6] Vital Capacity = IRV (inspiration) + ERV (expiration) ...read more.

Middle

-1.51 / 1.65 2. -1.74 / 1.43 3. -2.10 / 1.40 = 3.16 = 3.17 = 3.50 18 16 / 65kg / 174cm 26.11 / Crtyard / 11:25am 18 Ex low 1. -1.05 / 1.40 2. -2.06 / 1.11 3 -1.34 / 1.34 = 2.45 = 3.17 = 2.68 19 16 / 64kg / 174cm 26.11 / Crtyard / 11.30am 20 Low 1. -1.78 / 1.93 2. -2.60 / 1.77 3. -1.50 / 1.92 = 3.71 = 4.37 = 3.42 20 16 / 57kg / 169cm 27.11 / Crtyard / 8:15am 27 Ex high 1. -2.68 / 2.50 2. -2.97 / 3.29 3. -2.32 / 3.07 = 5.18 = 6.26 = 5.39 21 15 / 55kg / 174cm 27.11 / Crtyard / 8:26am 21 Medium 1. -1.40 / 2.38 2. -1.71 / 2.01 3. -1.66 / 1.54 = 3.78 = 3.72 = 3.20 22 16 / 59kg / 166cm 27.11 / Crtyard / 8:34am 23 High 1. -2.49 / 2.31 2. -2.37 / 2.01 3. -1.60 / 2.72 = 4.80 = 4.38 = 4.32 23 16 / 64kg / 174cm 27.11 / Crtyard / 8:40am 20 Low 1. -1.03 / 1.47 2. -2.93 / 1.40 3. -1.44 / 1.80 = 2.50 = 4.33 = 3.24 24 16 / 65kg / 175cm 27.11 / Crtyard / 8:45am 23 High 1. -1.84 / 2.26 2. -1.78 / 2.21 3. -2.66 / 2.41 = 4.10 = 3.99 = 5.07 25 15 / 62kg / 171cm 27.11 / Crtyard / 8:50am 26 Ex high 1. -2.36 / 3.35 2. -2.50 / 3.38 3. -2.90 / 2.47 = 5.71 = 5.88 = 5.37 Table 2.1: This table shows observations made on all participants during the experiment. Qualitative observations were recorded of participants as a whole group and not individually. Qualitative data such as breathing actions, breathing noises and breathing length of time was recorded. Qualitative Data * As all the participants of this experiment were males, tall and lean, when the participants breathe in deeply, their stomach is sucked in and the outline of their rib bones becomes visible. ...read more.

Conclusion

If you had to run at a moderate-high speed, how long would you last before stopping? o Less than 5 minutes o Between 5 to 10 minutes o Between 10 to 20 minutes o More than 30 minutes 2. What's your experience with strength training? o I've never lifted weights o I've lifted weights before, but not in the last year o I currently lift weights o I've been lifting weights for more than 6 months in the last two years 3. How often do you stretch (includes whole arm and whole leg, etc)? o I never stretch o I sometimes stretch o I stretch before and after every workout o I regularly stretch and do yoga and/or Pilates 4. Currently, how often do you exercise in a week (moderate-high cardio workout for at least 20 minutes)? o I don't o Once or twice a week o 3 to 4 times a week o More than 4 times a week 5. In the last 3 years, have you ever been involved in a competitive sporting activity outside of school? eg; basketball team o No o Yes, for less than a year o Yes, for 1 to 2 years o Yes, for more than two years and am currently involved 6. What is your usual style of exercise? o I don't have one o Slow exercises - eg; walking, yoga o Hard hitting exercises for a short period of time - eg; sprinting o Moderate level exercises over a period of time - eg; jogging, running 7. In regards to your current style of workouts, what happens after you finish exercising? o Light breathing and minimal perspiration o Moderate breathing and some perspiration o Moderate-heavy breathing and perspiration o Sustained heavy breathing and constant perspiration 8. How often do you warm-up before working out (at least 10 minutes of light-moderate exercises)? o Never o Rarely o Sometimes o Always Extremely low 8 - 18 Low 19 - 20 Medium 21 - 22 High 23 - 24 Extremely high 25 - 32 ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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