• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Rate of heat loss

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Planning (a) Aim: To investigate the factors which affect the rate of heat loss from a body. Theory: In this experiment we will study how several factors affect the rate of heat loss by carrying out investigations to test different hypotheses made concerning size, insulating layers, speed of evaporation of water, surrounding medium, etc. Several observations and claims can be explained using theoretical knowledge about the nature of a body and the rate of heat lost from it. 1. Short and fat people tend to lose heat more slowly than tall and thin people of the same body weight because their surface area to volume ratio is much smaller. As the rate of heat loss is directly proportional to the surface area volume ratio this means that even though the body weight is constant, this rate is higher in tall thin people than in short fat ones. 2. Several thin layers of clothing (insulating layer) keep you warmer than one thick layer as they contain a lot of air spaces in between which help to trap heat and hence reduce heat loss. As these tiny pockets containing air are absent in a single layer, it has poorer insulating action. Hence it can be concluded that several thin layers of clothing are more efficient at reducing heat loss than one thick layer. ...read more.

Middle

Investigating hypothesis 4: * Around 5-6 test tubes were individually covered with a layer of tissue paper. * A rubber band was used to tie the test tubes together in a group. * All of the test tubes were filled with hot water. * A thermometer, which was initially at room temperature, was placed into the test tube at the centre of the bundled group and allowed to reach the highest temperature. * The stopwatch was started and the temperature was recorded at regular intervals of 1 minute. * A single test tube was covered with a layer of tissue paper similar to that around each of the test tubes in the group. * A thermometer, which was initially at room temperature, was placed and allowed to reach the highest temperature. * The stopwatch was started and the temperature was recorded at regular intervals of 1 minute. Investigating hypothesis 5: * A beaker, which was large enough to fully contain a test tube, was filled with water at room temperature. * Then a test tube was taken and filled with hot water. * A thermometer, which was initially at room temperature, was placed inside the test tube and it was allowed to reach the highest temperature. ...read more.

Conclusion

The test tubes aren't exact representatives of people and animals due to differences in shape and size ratio. Due to these variations, the way in which heat is lost from the test tubes will definitely be different to the actual heat loss of humans and animals. Modification: The experiment can be modified to obtain more accurate results by the following: * Carrying out each of the above experiments more number of times to order greater accuracy. * These factors could be studied together to deduce which factor has a larger affect on the rate of heat loss. For instance a beaker, which represents a short fat person, could be covered with wet tissue paper whereas a test tube representing thin tall people could be covered with dry tissue paper. Conclusion The investigation verifies our hypotheses as: * The tall thin body lost heat more quickly than the short fat body * The body wrapped in several thin layers of material lost heat more slowly than the one which was wrapped in one think layer of the material * The body with a wet surface lost heat more quickly than the one with a wet surface * The huddled together bodies did not lose heat as quickly as a single body * The body in water lost heat more quickly than the body in air ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our International Baccalaureate Biology section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related International Baccalaureate Biology essays

  1. Ecology Open Investigation Does the geographic location affect the biotic and abiotic ...

    Each group collected the sample at different locations and at distant from surface level. The closer to the surface the higher the turbidity due to my organic matter is dropped into the water from the surrounding trees. The further from the surface the more volume there is of the site's

  2. Factors affecting the rate of transpiration

    This caused the plant to transpire thrice as fast as it does at a temperature of 20 �C. Therefore, the results obtained were not for normal conditions. The apparatus will be placed on a wooden surface so that heat is not conducted.

  1. Transpiration Investigation

    Variation due to different number of leaves, etc. The same cutting of cherry laurel will be used each time Variation of light levels over trial. It was found that the output of the lamp varied, particularly in the first few minutes after being turned on The lamp is allowed five minutes to come up to temperature.

  2. Penicillin - its discovery, properties and uses.

    Lysozyme, it had turned out, had little effect on those bacteria that cause dangerous diseases, but Fleming's experience with it meant he only needed a glance at his contaminated plate to recognize that something important might be happening, for on this plate the unknown mould was killing an organism which was a common source of dangerous infections, a staphylococcus.

  1. Should Animals have the same rights as Humans? Both animals and humans exhibit behaviours ...

    The Russian scientist Ivan Pavlov studied conditioned behavior scientifically. He noticed that when food (the primary stimulus) was placed in a dog's mouth the flow of saliva increased. It was when he observed that the dogs drooled without the proper stimulus that he became interested in studying reflexes.

  2. Biodiversity loss

    In recent years, environmental change has been having a bigger effect on healthcare than it ever did in the past. For example, the deforestation of rainforests has disease linkages such as the avian flu and the West Nile Virus. In addition, 1 billion people who depend on local food are

  1. Biology independent investigation, Ecology

    2 Pipette pump 2 200ml beaker (storage) 5 100ml beaker (smallest uncertainty possible) 5 Scale with milligram level of accuracy 1 Petri dishes 35 Knife for cutting roots (self supplied) 1 Over for heating (self supplied) 1 A pair of rubber gloves 1 Measuring flask- 50mls 1 7 medium sized

  2. Design an investigation into size and the rate of heat loss.

    Boil water in a kettle. 3. Measure 125 ml of boiling water into a beaker. 4. Place one potato piece into the beaker containing hot water and leave it in the water for five minutes. 5. Remove potato from water using tongs and place on tile.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work