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Design Lab-Voltaic Cell

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Introduction

The Effect of Different Electrodes on Voltage in a Voltaic Cell Purpose: To observe the voltage change in using different metals in the same constant solutions. Variables: * Dependent: The dependent variables are the use of different metals as electrodes. The different metals that are to be used in this experiment are Zinc, Copper, and Tin. Independent: The independent will be the voltage change of the voltaic cell. This data will be recorded in the data table. * Controlled: The controlled variables will be: > The solutions used as the two half cells, Cu2+ and Zn2+. - Using different solutions would present a need to test the effect they have on the voltage of the cell. > The molarity of the two solutions- Using different molarities might potentially increase or decrease voltage. ...read more.

Middle

Method: 1. Pour 100 mL of Copper (II) solution into one of you 150 mL beaker 2. Pour 100 mL of Zinc (II) solution into the other 150 mL beaker 3. Use a funnel to pour the Sodium Nitrate into your salt bridge until full. 4. Stuff appropriate sized cotton pieces at each opening of salt bridge. (Tear cotton, if needed. The cotton should block flow until the bridge is placed into the beakers.) 5. Set up equipment according to the diagram above. This set up will be repeated after each trial. Trial 1: For this trial Zn and Cu metals will be used. 1. Place the Zn electrode into the zinc solution and the Cu into the copper solution. 2. Attach the voltmeter, negative to the Zn and positive to the Cu. 3. Turn Voltmeter on and turn it to 20____???? ...read more.

Conclusion

Detach the voltmeter, wipe clean the electrodes. 6. Now place Zn into the copper solution and Sn into the zinc solution. 7. Attach Voltmeter, negative to Sn, and negative to Zn. 8. Repeat steps 3 & 4 9. Clean all equipment Trial 3: Cu and Sn electrodes will be used in this trial. 1. Place the Cu electrode into the zinc solution and the Sn into the copper solution. 2. Attach the voltmeter, negative to the Cu and positive to the Sn. 3. Turn Voltmeter on and turn it to 20____???? 4. Record the Voltage in the data table. 5. Detach the voltmeter, wipe clean the electrodes. 6. Now place Cu into the copper solution and Sn into the zinc solution. 7. Attach Voltmeter, negative to Sn, and negative to Cu. 8. Repeat steps 3 & 4 9. Clean all equipment and station. Trial 1 Trial 2 Trial 3 Part 1 2 1 2 1 2 Positive Electrode Negative Electrode Voltage ...read more.

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