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Gas Law Stoichiometry Through Airbag Simulation. The purpose of this lab is to determine the correct ratio of baking soda and vinegar that leaves leaves no appreciable amount of either reactant leftover and yet fully inflates the bag without bursting.

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Introduction

Gas Law Stoichiometry Through Airbag Simulation Purpose- The purpose of this lab is to determine the correct ratio of baking soda and vinegar that leaves leaves no appreciable amount of either reactant leftover and yet fully inflates the bag without bursting. Materials- Water, ziplock bag, graduated cylinder, scale, baking soda, vinegar, goggles, apron, thermometer, and calculator. Variables- Dependent- Amount of CO2 Independent- Vinegar Controlled- Baking soda Procedure- 1) Calculate how much baking soda should be used 2) Fill the bag with water and empty into graduated cylinder to find the volume of the bag 3) Measure out amount of calculated baking soda 4) Pour first trial amount of vinegar into bag and put it in one corner 5) ...read more.

Middle

Therefore our calculations for the amount of baking soda was correct while the amount of vinegar was wrong. In order to find the amount of vinegar needed we had to do trial and error which led us to conclude that 4.84 grams of baking soda with 62.2 mL of vinegar will react completely to fill up our ziplock bag without bursting it. Discussion of Theory- This lab helped to prove that the combined gas law(PV=nRT) is true. This was proven by the fact that our amount of baking soda we thought we should use after calculations was correct and did not need to be changed. Error of Analysis- We failed to take into the account that the bag had to be shaken in order to make ...read more.

Conclusion

Abstract- The purpose of this lab was to determine what amount of baking soda and vinegar would mix together to form enough CO2 to fill the bag without bursting through the combined gas law. To do this we had to find the volume of the bag and plug that into the combined gas law to determine the amount of baking soda to use. We then added this amount with an amount of vinegar to see which way worked. We found that the amount of baking soda the combined gas law gave us was correct but that we had to alter the amount of vinegar. We also noted that the reaction was endothermic because of the temperature drop. Therefore we were able to conclude that the combined gas law did work in helping to determine what amount of baking soda to use. Christina Cartagena 8/22/10 ...read more.

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