• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Gas Law Stoichiometry Through Airbag Simulation. The purpose of this lab is to determine the correct ratio of baking soda and vinegar that leaves leaves no appreciable amount of either reactant leftover and yet fully inflates the bag without bursting.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Gas Law Stoichiometry Through Airbag Simulation Purpose- The purpose of this lab is to determine the correct ratio of baking soda and vinegar that leaves leaves no appreciable amount of either reactant leftover and yet fully inflates the bag without bursting. Materials- Water, ziplock bag, graduated cylinder, scale, baking soda, vinegar, goggles, apron, thermometer, and calculator. Variables- Dependent- Amount of CO2 Independent- Vinegar Controlled- Baking soda Procedure- 1) Calculate how much baking soda should be used 2) Fill the bag with water and empty into graduated cylinder to find the volume of the bag 3) Measure out amount of calculated baking soda 4) Pour first trial amount of vinegar into bag and put it in one corner 5) ...read more.

Middle

Therefore our calculations for the amount of baking soda was correct while the amount of vinegar was wrong. In order to find the amount of vinegar needed we had to do trial and error which led us to conclude that 4.84 grams of baking soda with 62.2 mL of vinegar will react completely to fill up our ziplock bag without bursting it. Discussion of Theory- This lab helped to prove that the combined gas law(PV=nRT) is true. This was proven by the fact that our amount of baking soda we thought we should use after calculations was correct and did not need to be changed. Error of Analysis- We failed to take into the account that the bag had to be shaken in order to make ...read more.

Conclusion

Abstract- The purpose of this lab was to determine what amount of baking soda and vinegar would mix together to form enough CO2 to fill the bag without bursting through the combined gas law. To do this we had to find the volume of the bag and plug that into the combined gas law to determine the amount of baking soda to use. We then added this amount with an amount of vinegar to see which way worked. We found that the amount of baking soda the combined gas law gave us was correct but that we had to alter the amount of vinegar. We also noted that the reaction was endothermic because of the temperature drop. Therefore we were able to conclude that the combined gas law did work in helping to determine what amount of baking soda to use. Christina Cartagena 8/22/10 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our International Baccalaureate Chemistry section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related International Baccalaureate Chemistry essays

  1. IB IA: Gas Law Experiment - testing Boyles Law, Charles Law and Ideal Gas ...

    mass = number of mol m/M = n Hence, PV = nRT PV = m RT M M= m RT PV In this case, R: 8.134JK-1mol-1 P: 733mm Hg X 101.325 kPa 760mm Hg =97.7253 kPa V: 155.0 cm3 1000 =0.155 dm3 T: 73.30 �C + 273.15 =376.42 K Relative

  2. Can one determine the coefficients of a balanced chemical equation by having the mass ...

    There was also a weakness in the last step due to time constraints. A lot of the copper oxidized in the experiment resulting in copper(ii) oxide as well as malachite ().

  1. Airbag design lab. Is it possible to use baking soda, NaHCO3(s), and 2.00 ...

    The volume of the bag will then allow the calculations of the amount of baking soda and hydrochloric acid needed to create a reaction. Once the volume of the Ziploc bag is known, the atmospheric pressure as well as the water vapour pressure as well as the temperature must be

  2. Hesss Law Lab, use Hesss law to find the enthalpy change of combustion of ...

    The molar enthalpy of one reaction was given and the other molar enthalpies were determined experimentally. A temperature probe was used to calculate the temperature change in both of the reactions. Because of poor isolation, all the graphs were extrapolated according to their cooling rate after the maximum temperature, but

  1. Research report on Stoichiometry

    Stoichiometry is often used to balance chemical equations. The term stoichiometry is also often used for the molar proportions of elements in stoichiometric compounds (composition stoichiometry). Stoichiometry is not only used to balance chemical equations but also used in conversions, i.e., converting from grams to moles, or from grams to milliliters.

  2. To determine the standard enthalpy of formation of Magnesium Oxide using Hess Law.

    1 × petri dish To be used when weighing out MgO powder. Petri dishes are easy to clean and the amount of powder on it can be adjusted very easily because they are shallow. 2 × rubber band To be used in making the Styrofoam cup calorimeter.

  1. Chemistry Internal Assessment Hesss Law

    - ?H (kJ mol-1) Hess?s Law Equation Enthalpy Absolute Uncertainty Percentage Uncertainty 1 MgSO4(s) ? Mg2+(aq) + SO42-(aq) 2 MgSO4.7H2O(s) ? Mg2+(aq) + SO42-(aq) + 7H2O(l) -1 Mg2+-(aq) + SO42-(aq) + 7H2O(l) ? MgSO4.7H2O(s) 1+2 MgSO4(s) + 7H2O(l) ? MgSO4.7H2O(s)

  2. Chemistry thermo lab, Hess's Law.

    3. Now for mass: 1. 2. As for the energy gained: 1. 2. Now for the energy of the reaction: 1. It is multiplied by an integer (-1) so it is the same unc. As for the moles: 1.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work