• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Gas Law Stoichiometry Through Airbag Simulation. The purpose of this lab is to determine the correct ratio of baking soda and vinegar that leaves leaves no appreciable amount of either reactant leftover and yet fully inflates the bag without bursting.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Gas Law Stoichiometry Through Airbag Simulation Purpose- The purpose of this lab is to determine the correct ratio of baking soda and vinegar that leaves leaves no appreciable amount of either reactant leftover and yet fully inflates the bag without bursting. Materials- Water, ziplock bag, graduated cylinder, scale, baking soda, vinegar, goggles, apron, thermometer, and calculator. Variables- Dependent- Amount of CO2 Independent- Vinegar Controlled- Baking soda Procedure- 1) Calculate how much baking soda should be used 2) Fill the bag with water and empty into graduated cylinder to find the volume of the bag 3) Measure out amount of calculated baking soda 4) Pour first trial amount of vinegar into bag and put it in one corner 5) ...read more.

Middle

Therefore our calculations for the amount of baking soda was correct while the amount of vinegar was wrong. In order to find the amount of vinegar needed we had to do trial and error which led us to conclude that 4.84 grams of baking soda with 62.2 mL of vinegar will react completely to fill up our ziplock bag without bursting it. Discussion of Theory- This lab helped to prove that the combined gas law(PV=nRT) is true. This was proven by the fact that our amount of baking soda we thought we should use after calculations was correct and did not need to be changed. Error of Analysis- We failed to take into the account that the bag had to be shaken in order to make ...read more.

Conclusion

Abstract- The purpose of this lab was to determine what amount of baking soda and vinegar would mix together to form enough CO2 to fill the bag without bursting through the combined gas law. To do this we had to find the volume of the bag and plug that into the combined gas law to determine the amount of baking soda to use. We then added this amount with an amount of vinegar to see which way worked. We found that the amount of baking soda the combined gas law gave us was correct but that we had to alter the amount of vinegar. We also noted that the reaction was endothermic because of the temperature drop. Therefore we were able to conclude that the combined gas law did work in helping to determine what amount of baking soda to use. Christina Cartagena 8/22/10 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our International Baccalaureate Chemistry section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related International Baccalaureate Chemistry essays

  1. IB IA: Gas Law Experiment - testing Boyles Law, Charles Law and Ideal Gas ...

    mass = number of mol m/M = n Hence, PV = nRT PV = m RT M M= m RT PV In this case, R: 8.134JK-1mol-1 P: 733mm Hg X 101.325 kPa 760mm Hg =97.7253 kPa V: 155.0 cm3 1000 =0.155 dm3 T: 73.30 �C + 273.15 =376.42 K Relative

  2. Airbag design lab. Is it possible to use baking soda, NaHCO3(s), and 2.00 ...

    The volume of the bag will then allow the calculations of the amount of baking soda and hydrochloric acid needed to create a reaction. Once the volume of the Ziploc bag is known, the atmospheric pressure as well as the water vapour pressure as well as the temperature must be

  1. Investigation 1 ANALYSIS OF BAKING SODA

    Read the first volume number of HCL. d. Put some HCL solution to the flask that with no foam. Then read the volume number of HCL added. e. Add 1~2 drops of thymol blue indicator to the flask. Then we can see the mixture turn red.

  2. hess's law

    Hence, on the basis of this, I predict that the change in enthalpy for formation of hydrated copper sulphate according to the above reaction will be negative, signifying that the overall reaction is exothermic. Therefore, I predict that the molar enthalpy change of formation of hydrated copper sulphate from anhydrous

  1. Change of Potential Difference in Voltaic Cells Lab Report

    As the concentration of copper sulfate solution increases, the potential difference (voltage) between the two half cells increases. Sample Calculations Preparation of Copper sulfate Penta-hydrate solution To prepare 50 ml of 1dm-3mol (M) copper sulfate solution, use the formula: Mass = number of moles molar mass The molar mass of copper sulfate pentahydrate is 249.71g/mol.

  2. IB questions and answers on Atomic Theory

    from n = 4 to n = 1 b) from n = 4 to n = 3 c) from n = 2 to n = 1 d) from n = 1 to n = 4 33. Consider only the first four primary energy levels of a hydrogen atom. The transition that would result in photon of the longest wavelength would be a)

  1. To determine the standard enthalpy of formation of Magnesium Oxide using Hess Law.

    the following method can be used for calculating the value for ?HMgO. ?HMgO = ?HX - ?HY + ?HH2O * ?HMgO = -253.5kJ.mol-1 - -106.3kJ.mol-1 -285kJ.mol-1 * ?HMgO = -253.5 + 106.3 - 285 * ?HMgO = -432.2kJ.mol-1 Therefore, the standard enthalpy of formation of MgO: Mg (s)

  2. Organic lab. Comparison of alkanes and alkenes

    Part III ? Alcohols and Carboxylic acids 1. Oxidation of ethanol Substance Ethanol + potassium dichromate + dilute sulfuric acid Observations When first placed in the water bath the solution turns from orange-yellow to first a light green. The smell is quite alcoholic and strong, pungent.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work