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Lab Report - Flame Test

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Introduction

Chemistry Lab Report Aim: To determine the colours of the Atomic Emission Spectra of several metallic ions by the flame test. Theoretical background: Flame tests are a quick and easy method of producing the characteristic colours of metal ions. Metal salts contain loosely held electrons that are easily exited on heating. These exited electron then return to a lower energy level by emitting energy in the visible portion of the spectrum, which can be seen as a coloured flame. This colour can be used to determine which ion is being burnt as each ion emits a certain specific combination of wavelengths which correspond to specific colours. Variables: Independent Variable: Metal Salt Dependent Variable: Colour of the flame Controlled Variable: Quantity of the metal salt taken. Apparatus: * Safety goggles * Latex gloves * Nichrome wire * Bunsen burner * Hydrochloric acid * Wash bottle(with distilled water) ...read more.

Middle

The acid has been neutralized when bubbles of gas no longer form after addition of the bicarbonate. If you need to dispose of a small quantity of acid, neutralize the sample bicarbonate before pouring it down the drain. * Do not at any time touch the end of the wire loop used in the flame tests. This wire get extremely hot and can cause severe burns. Remember that a wire can be hot and yet appear no different from a cool wire. Procedure:- * Put on safety goggles and latex gloves. * Fill a beaker with about 10 ml of HCl and light the bunsen burner, making sure to adjust the flame to low (i.e. the flame should be pale blue in colour) * Clean the nichrome wire by washing it first with tap water, then dip it in the HCl and heat it for a couple of seconds using the bunsen burner. ...read more.

Conclusion

Potassium Sulphate Lilac Strontium Chloride Bright red Calcium Sulphate Brick red Calcium Carbonate Brick red Calcium Chloride Brick red Copper Carbonate Green blue Copper Sulphate Green blue Conclusion/Analysis:- From this experiment I have learned that salt solutions containing strontium and lithium, both producing red, have longer wavelengths meanwhile salt solutions containing barium, calcium, and copper have shorter wavelengths. When burning the sample in the flame the colour of the flame wasn't clear. I overcame this problem by using more of the salt until the colour was clear. Also when going from one test to another the tests was contaminated and there was a mixture of colours. I overcame this problem by placing it in the flame then placing it in the hydrochloric acid then placing it in the flame. I did this until I saw that when I place the loop in the flame that there is no colour. ...read more.

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