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Rates of Reaction Lab Report - magnesium and hydrochloric acid

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Introduction

RATES OF REACTION LAB REPORT(c) AIM: Answer the Research Question (RQ)! RQ: What is the correlation between chewing and digestion? BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Chewing is an extremely important, yet oftentimes overlooked, part of healthy digestion. Most people put food in their mouth, chew a few times and swallow their food, as if their sole focus was how quickly they could get their foods to their stomachs. The action of chewing mechanically breaks down very large aggregates of food molecules into smaller particles. This results in the food having increased surface area, an important contributing factor to good digestion. HYPOTHESIS: The longer the chewing period and intensity, the larger the resultant surface area, which should result in a faster rate of reaction. INDEPENDENT VARIABLE: Reactant surface area (mm2) DEPENDENT VARIABLE: Time (sec) CONTROLLED VARIABLES: HOW it was controlled: 1. Reactant Magnesium was used throughout the experiment. 2. Acid HCL was used throughout the experiment. 3. Molarity of HCL acid {M} A molarity of 1 was used throughout the experiment. 4. Pressure (on the hydrogen bubble) {Pa} vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv a. ...read more.

Middle

5. Place 1 strip in the cylinder, start the stopwatch, clamp your thumb (or finger) over the top of the cylinder, invert the cylinder then submerge it in the acid in the large beaker, then release your thumb (finger). It is imperative all these steps are done at light speed. 6. Stop the stopwatch once the hydrogen air bubble reaches 6 mL. 7. Repeat steps 5 and 6 changing only the number of magnesium strips, essentially adding one more each time. 8. Repeat step 7 as many times as possible until consistent results are obtained. DATA COLLECTION: 1 Strip: Trail 1 2 3 4 5 Time (s) �0.36% 27.46 27.46 27.46 27.46 27.46 2 Strips: Trail 1 2 3 4 5 Time (s) �1.00% 10.03 10.03 10.03 10.03 10.03 3 Strips: Trail 1 2 3 4 5 Time (s) �1.60% 6.25 6.25 6.25 6.25 6.25 4 Strips: Trail 1 2 3 4 5 Time (s) �1.78% 5.63 5.63 5.63 5.63 5.63 5 Strips: Trail 1 2 3 4 5 Time (s) �1.98% 5.06 5.06 5.06 5.06 5.06 Strip Dimensions: Ruler uncertainty: �0.5 mm Thickness: 0.5 mm �100.0% Width: 3.0 mm �16.7% Length: 10.0 mm �5.0% DATA PROCESSING: Total Surface Area (SA) ...read more.

Conclusion

So technically, a measurement of 0.5mm with a ruler, whose smallest graduation is 1mm, will lead to 100% uncertainty; however, in reality, I doubt it that the uncertainty is actually that large; which is why this issue is only a weakness, and not a limitation. Therefore, the conclusion and data are accurate and reliable, because the trend is clear. Another weakness is the method. In terms of safety, it's generally unsafe to go about placing one's hand in acid; even if the acid is really weak at 1 M. Also, the method was tedious and was rather manual and primitive, specifically the part where the chemist is required to clamp their thumb (finger) over the cylinder's top. IMPROVEMENTS: The most important improvement is to use a more accurate measurement device to measure the dimensions of the magnesium strips, particularly the thickness. Or using a different reactant that provides for a better shape, for a more accurate dimension measurement. Addressing the second weakness concerning the method; using a gas syringe would've been more efficient, and less tedious, not to mention safer. ?? ?? ?? ?? Al-Ghraoui(tm) Page 7 of 7 Tammam Al-Ghraoui Chemistry SL Mr. Barrett Sunday, June 13th, 2010. Page 1 of 1 Al-Ghraoui (tm) ...read more.

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