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Smoking in the UK - economic analysis of its costs.

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Introduction

Smoking in UK Name: Hans ID NO.:GZ-11-0033 Group: Keynes Word count: 1318 Date: Dec.19th Contents 1. Introduction 1 1.1 Background 1 1.2 Definition 1 1.2.1 External benefit 1 1.2.2 External cost 1 1.3 Theory 1 1.4 Aims 2 2. Finding 2 2.1 External benefit of smoking 2 2.2 External cost of smoking 2 2.21 Secondhand smoking 2 2.3 The policy of UK Government 2 ?2.31 The ban of advertising 2 2.32 The prohibiting in public place 3 3. Discussions 3 3.1 Taxation 3 3.2Advertising 4 4. Conclusion 4 4.1 Summary 4 4.2 Recommendation 4 5. Reference 4 1. Introduction 1.1 Background United Kingdom was the original state of smoking prevalence and smoking has caused widespread death of the first countries. According to ASH1 (2011) "there are about 10 million adults who smoke cigarettes in Great Britain" which is "about a sixth of the total UK population". Throughout the United Kingdom, there was about one-third per cent of all the middle age's deaths caused by smoking. Therefore, United Kingdom is one of the most importance states of tobacco control. Government control on cigarette consumption through different instruments such as advertising-all advertising and promotion of tobacco are banned in the UK; taxation-taxation is probably the most effective means of reducing tobacco consumption. Raising tobacco prices through taxation can result in significant benefits to the economy. ...read more.

Middle

shows that the link between passive smoking and both lung cancer and coronary heart disease, increasing the risk for each by around 25%. Secondhand smoking also does harm to babies and children which "with an increased risk of respiratory infections, increased severity of asthma symptoms, more frequent occurrence of chronic coughs, phlegm and wheezing, and increased risk of cot death and glue ear."(ASH1, 2011) 2.3 The policy of UK Government ?2.31 The ban of advertising Advertisement has high influence in propagating. Thus, prohibiting the advertising of cigarette is a useful way to control the consumption of tobacco. The Tobacco Advertising and Promotion Act which was enacted in 2003, 'prohibited virtually all forms of tobacco advertising and promotion', including 'print media' and 'billboards', and 'sponsorship of sport' was finally forbidden by July 2005. Moreover, as the ASH (2011) said that the UK Government estimated that banning cigarette advertising would lead to the decrease of consumption of around 3%. 2.32 The prohibiting in public place Smoking in public places and workplaces is now banned by law in UK. Except some places which include "guest bedrooms in hotels and certain rooms in care homes, hospices and prisons". (ASH, 2011)Other public place and work place must no smoking such as restaurant. One typical example is Pizza Hut restaurants where smoking has no longer been permitted in all the 350 restaurants since early this year (Smoking in public place, 2003) ...read more.

Conclusion

Small shops will have until April 2015 to comply with the law."(ASH3, 2011)Moreover, the UK government introduced picture warnings on cigarette packs in October 2008. The picture of package will make smoker feel nausea because the picture is about what result after people smoking such as yellow tooth or black lung. This is also the efficacious means to reduce the consumption of tobacco and the number of smokers. 4. Conclusion 4.1 Summary All in all, smoking has more disadvantages than advantages even only harm and no good. As we all know, teenager smoking is also a problem which must be solved. It is easy to get disease and smokers often live in a short life. So governments try various devices to restrain the consumption of cigarette to resolve these problems. 4.2 Recommendation In order to efficaciously control the consumption of cigarette, government can set up more festival about banning smoking and propagate some preferential policy. For example, when people agree to give up smoking, the person will get corresponding subsidize. 5. Reference Anderton.A(2008) Economics(5th Edition) Harlow Person Education ASH1(2011)[online]Smoking statistics Available at http://www.ash.org.uk/information/facts-and-stats/fact-sheets [Accessed at 16/12/2011] ASH2 (2011)[online]Tobacco regulation Available at http://www.ash.org.uk/information/facts-and-stats/fact-sheets [Accessed at 16/12/2011] ASH3 (2011)[online]Tobacco economics Available at http://www.ash.org.uk/information/facts-and-stats/fact-sheets [Accessed at 16/12/2011] Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews. [online]Volume 29, Issue 6. 2005; 1021-1034 Available at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0149763405000874[Accessed at 7/12/2011] Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology (2003) Smoking in public place Available at http://www.parliament.uk/documents/post/pn206.pdf [Accessed at 26/12/2011] ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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