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Foreign Talent-Dilemma in Singapore. as we shall explain, illustrate and seek to convince in this report, foreign talent help to make Singapore more competitive, and create more opportunities than we can generate on our own. This will be crucial in enabl

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

"Attracting Talent vs Looking After Singaporeans" INTRODUCTION: A VISION FOR SINGAPORE 1. In the 21st century, Singapore will be even better than it is today: an exciting city in which to work, live and play; a global hub pulsating with energy and ideas. The Singapore economy will be vibrant, our culture brimming with diversity, and our society strong and united. 2. To achieve our vision, we must make Singapore a centre of opportunity. Singapore will be a hub in Asia where people can advance their economic lifestyles, pursue their interests and find happiness in their lives. We will be a society where everyone matters, where everyone is valued, and recognised for his or her myriad contributions. 3. Singapore's continued prosperity and success depends on our ability to maximise the talents of all Singaporeans, as well as to develop a deep-seated sense of belonging - or rootedness - to Singapore. Singaporeans must be allowed to become the best they can be. We should develop a more encompassing definition of success. People must be encouraged to try the road less taken, to explore what lies off the beaten track. We must recognise success even in the single penny picked up at the end of the rainbow, and respect, applaud and celebrate the diverse accomplishments of fellow citizens. Locals have to feel that Singapore is our best home, best hope. Singaporeans must believe in our country, identify with its destiny and stand ready to contribute to, suffer for and defend our society, values and nation. 4. Our continued success also depends on our ability to attract and retain talent. In the new millennium, talent is not something "nice" to have; it is the essential ingredient for sustained success. We should not see foreign talent as queue-jumpers in the race for j obs in Singapore; nor as opportunists competing unfairly. Rather, as we shall explain, illustrate and seek to convince in this report, foreign talent help to make Singapore more competitive, and create more opportunities than we can generate on our own. ...read more.

Middle

felt that the specific targeting of foreigners would crowd their kids out of the best schools. Worse, allowing large numbers of foreign students would have a ripple-down effect and make it even more difficult than now for young Singaporeans to find a place in good schools. 49. Unlike the first concern, these concerns were expressed by parents who were worried about the hope and future of their children, rather than their own immediate welfare. Some asked the government to protect the positions for Singaporean children in good schools. They argued that our children should be given the best educational opportunities, so that they could compete in future as working adults. 50. We are confident that the government will ensure that no child in Singapore is denied a place in our schools. However, to realise our vision for Singapore, we cannot shy away from competition. We can choose to bury our heads in the sand like ostriches but that will not make the competition go away. Protectionism will not help us but stymie the growth of our children. Instead, teaching our children early how to swim will ensure they can swim faster and further later on in life. 51. Foreign students will benefit our schools and children. They will raise standards by spurring excellence in our classes. Like foreign talent in our work force, foreign students in our schools are another resource we can tap. They bring with them new cultures, innovative ideas which can stimulate and broaden the outlook of our local students. Many schools are already observing national days of other countries and celebrating cultural diversity. 52. The youth of Singapore must also develop international awareness and global mindset. An island mindset will spell undisputed failure for Singapore. We must create opportunities for our students to travel overseas and interact with foreign students. Some schools are already organising excursions, study trips and exchange visits during school holidays to countries like the UK, France, Australia and China. ...read more.

Conclusion

Singapore prospered because they came and contributed. 91. For Singapore to remain competitive and prosperous, we must be like the sea , receiving a continual flow of talent. We also need to develop and maximise the talents and abilities of all Singaporeans. No vision of Singapore can be sustained unless we can keep and develop our local talent. There is no contradiction between attracting foreign talent and nurturing local talent. They are not two horns locked forever in battle but two wings that will propel a thriving Singapore. Foreign talent is not "them" and locals "us". Instead, "we" are the same team competing together against the world. Everyone matters to Singapore's success. For the want of a nail, A shoe was lost. For the want of a shoe, A horse was lost. For the want of a horse, A soldier was lost. For the want of a soldier, A war was lost. For the want of a war, A kingdom was lost. And all for the want of a horse shoe nail. 92. This report attempts to capture some of the key concerns and recommendations that emerged from our committee's meetings, deliberations with the public and the broad consensus which eventually emerged. Our views are by no means comprehensive; neither do we claim that our recommendations are the only right ones. But we have put them forth in the belief that these are aspects of the society we want to create and the dream we have. Our forefathers too came to Singapore with their dreams. They came, stayed and were transformed into Singaporeans. 93. This is our unfolding Singapore story, a global centre of opportunity. Let's join our hands to realise our vision for Singapore. . . . . . 1 Ghoshal, S. & Bartlett, C. A. (June 28, 1998). "Play the right card to get the aces in the pack: Management recruitment". Financial Times, p. 14. 2 "Johns Hopkins hospital in Singapore" (November 5, 1998). The Straits Times, p. 35. 3 Velloor, R. (October 22, 1998). "Caltex to move global HQ here", The Straits Times, p. 1. ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 ...read more.

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