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Richmond Shopping Field Study

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

1 Table of Contents Title Page.................................................................................................................................................................................... Table of Contents...................................................................................................................................................................... Aim.............................................................................................................................................................................................. Hypothesis................................................................................................................................................................................. Background Theories............................................................................................................................................................... Methods of Data Collection.................................................................................................................................................... Data Interpretation and Analysis........................................................................................................................................... Conclusion................................................................................................................................................................................. Evaluation.................................................................................................................................................................................. Aim The aim of this field study is to investigate if a shopping hierarchy exists within the City of Richmond based on an examination of the number and variety of individual stores in 20 different shopping centres. The City of Richmond an island city in the mouth of the Fraser River located on Canada's Pacific coast in the province of British Columbia2. Richmond is close to the Canada-U.S.A. border near the 49th parallel and is part of Metro Vancouver. (Please refer to Map 1). The city is relatively small with an area of approximately 130 km2 and a population of about 188,000 people3. Richmond became a municipality on November 10, 18794 and was originally economically dependent on agriculture. Even then, shops were in existence all over the municipality to provide goods and services to the farmers. The retail sector still remained after the shift from agriculture to a wider economic sector and has since morphed into a variety of shopping centres ranging from small convenience stores to large malls. Because of the variety a hierarchy is probable hence the aim of this field study. Map 1. Location Map of Richmond. 5 Hypothesis A hierarchy of shopping centres can be identified in the city of Richmond. An assortment of shopping centres varying in size will be studied and their centrality values along with other factors such as accessibility will be used to determine if a shopping hierarchy exists. The difference between large malls such as Richmond Centre and small clusters of stores such as Blundell Plaza is immense thus a hierarchy of shopping centres is created. A higher centrality index value would indicate a higher position of a shopping centre on the hierarchy. Walter Christaller's Central Place Theory will be used as a backdrop for the investigation of the possible hierarchy of shopping centres within Richmond. ...read more.

Middle

Edward's Crossing 7 Ironwood Plaza 17 Minato Village 8 Continental Centre 18 Blundell Plaza 9 Garden City Shopping Centre 19 Complex (NW corner) 10 Richlea Square 20 Complex (SE corner) The ranking of stores suggests the order that they should be in, it is not however the ultimate deciding factor. Below is the table showing what classifies shopping centres under orders two to five since the first and the sixth order shopping centres are not being looked at. This table was extrapolated from the figures 1 and 3. Figure 9. Guideline for the Classification of Shopping Centres Order Type of Shopping Centre Description and Goods Sold Sphere of Influence Second Retail cluster Food and household goods. Low order goods. Neighbouring streets Third Neighbourhood shopping centre Large number of shops selling a large range of convenience goods. Some services. Mainly low order goods. Neighbourhood Fourth Major suburban centre Wide range of goods and services, some chain stores. Middle order goods. Up to 30 km or a larger shopping centre. Fifth Regional shopping centre Wide range of goods and services, some chain and department stores. High order goods. Increasingly specialist. Up to 80 km or a larger shopping centre. The twenty shopping centres that were investigated in the field study will now be classified into the respective orders. Only centres needing special attention will be explained due to the limiting word count. Richmond Centre- is Richmond's largest shopping centre in terms of the number of stores and received the highest centrality index value out of all the shopping centres studied. The mall carries a wide assortment of goods ranging from traditional Chinese medicine products to kayaks in Sport Chek. There are many chain stores such as HMV and a Canadian favourite Tim Horton's. There are also department stores present and specialist services are in abundance. Richmond Centre can be safely classified as a fifth order regional shopping centre since it amply fulfills the required criteria. ...read more.

Conclusion

The map on the following page illustrates the spheres of influence of a shopping centre in each order. A hierarchy of shopping centres does exist in Richmond but, it is not entirely dependent on the Centrality Index. The hierarchy in Richmond based on all aforementioned factors is as follows: Figure 19. Hierarchy of Shopping Centres in Richmond Conclusion and Evaluation "Is there a shopping hierarchy within Richmond?" was the focal point of this field study. My hypothesis stated that there is a shopping hierarchy evident by the disparity between the shopping centres, and the data proved it through a variety of indicators such as spheres of influence and the Centrality Index. The problem with using the Centrality Index to determine if there is a hierarchy is that there is a difference in personal judgments where one person might consider Sport Chek a department store while another might put it under supplies. That is why stores that were unclear, were written down a collective decision was made on their type. Calculating the Centrality Index involved classifying stores into types and there might have been possible errors in that area. Completing all the data gathering individually would solve the problem but, is extremely time consuming. Divisions between orders and classifying centres was also problematic since they did not always fit perfectly, thus it had to be an estimation. In addition, the shopping centres used were not a perfect representation of Richmond. Aberdeen Centre is another "Asia-centric" mall located on No 3 Rd. (Please refer to Map 8) Map 8. Aberdeen Centre 15 1 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:RichCtr-interior.jpg 2 http://www.richmond.ca/discover/about/profile.htm 3 http://www.richmond.ca/discover/about/profile.htm 4 http://www.richmond.ca/discover/about/profile.htm 5 http://www.richmond.ca/__shared/assets/location-metromap7587.jpg 6 Arber, Nicola, and John Hopkin. Geography Matters. Ed. Paul Brooker. New York: Heinemann Educational, 2001. 7 Arber, Nicola, and John Hopkin. Geography Matters. Ed. Paul Brooker. New York: Heinemann Educational, 2001. 8 Central Place Theory handout 9 Arber, Nicola, and John Hopkin. Geography Matters. Ed. Paul Brooker. New York: Heinemann Educational, 2001. 10 http://www.lansdowne-centre.com/info.htm 11 http://chineseinvancouver.blogspot.com/2007/12/richmond-bc-leads-all-canadian-cities.html 12 http://content.answers.com/main/content/img/oxford/Oxford_Geography/0198606737.bid-rent-theory.1.jpg 13 http://www.translink.bc.ca/files/maps/sys_maps/sys_Richmond_SDelta.pdf 14 http://www.bcstats.gov.bc.ca/data/cen01/PopDens2001.pdf 15 http://www.aberdeencentre.com/en/map.php ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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