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Tourism Case Study

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Tourism in Cairo and in the Valley of the Kings by Casey Larson Tourism is a massive industry in which participants can travel all around the globe to see different cultures, such as the tourists seen in picture 1. It can help create a prosperous economy through its direct economic benefits, as well as to destroy a place, taking its Picture 1 irreplaceable culture with it. Tourism, like globalization, can give a country wealth, but can also cause irreplaceable social and cultural damages. The rise of the tourism industry can be traced to the lowering costs of transportation, the big volume of tourists who can afford to travel and have the time, as well as international communications which has allowed a person to have information on different areas of the world and to pick out a place they would like to visit. The improvements of these aspects through better technology, called the process of time-space compression, combined with more peoples' incomes in developing countries increasing, has predictably led to a rise in tourism world wide. This has led to tourism playing an even bigger role in the global economy, and nowhere is this as true as in Egypt. Egypt is a country located in north eastern Africa, with some territory in Asia, as seen in map 1. This is a country of 75 million, in which its main industries include services (51% of work force), agriculture (32%) and industry (17%0). This is a Muslim dominated country with 90 % of Map 1 the population following that faith. Women rights are limited, with only 59% of the women literate, compared to 83 % of the male population. This country is experiencing labour shortages, despite having an unemployment t rate of 10.3 % in 2007 (20.4 % that are unemployed are women), which can bring into the question of what the problem is. The problem is a lack of skilled workers which is related to the education system, which in turn is related to the tourism industry. ...read more.

Middle

This results in the local culture being changed to fit that of the culture of the tourists, which creates a ton of social issues by itself, never mind the issues caused by mass homelessness. Picture 6 Tourism has contributed to the social and cultural issues that abound in Egypt today. The mass homelessness as well as a loss of culture has been one of the many problems brought up, but these problems have developed further to create and highlight bigger issues in Egypt. The homelessness has highlighted the lack of response and structure of Egypt as it is unprepared to handle such stresses. Crime has risen, and is linked to the mass homelessness. The education system, although already in a mess, is endangered further by the problem of early dropouts, which lowers the incentive for the government to invest in it either resource wise or in talent wise with the proper training for teachers. This has given rise to international schools, such as the IBO, which follow a western styled system, or religious schools, as seen in image 7, which promote their religion through the teaching of people from a young age that their religion is right. This religious schooling has helped to contribute to the extremism of religions in Egypt. But the problems that strike home for residents of Cairo and Luxor, a city outside of the Valley of the Kings, is the cultural issues brought on by westernization of the businesses and streets to attract western tourists. The friction being built up between the residents and the tourists can Picture 7 be seen in the terrorist attacks outside of Luxor that killed 62 people in 1997, and the occasional terrorist attack on local tourist areas in Cairo and the surrounding country side. These religious militant groups believe that their way of life is in danger, and blame the tourists for it. These attacks have killed more bystanders than tourists, but the point is still clear: they want the tourists out. ...read more.

Conclusion

Including women in the education system would help create an educated work force, instead of having half the population stay at home remaining unskilled for the international economy. Their should also be regulations on the pollution that the industry promotes, as this Picture 12 would improve the health of people as well as keep the bloodline for their agricultural industry clean. But the major problem that has to be dealt with first before all the rest is the corruption in government. As long as it stays strong, these improvements will have a hard time of even being publicly known. These solutions are only some suggestions to help create a more sustainable, and fair tourism industry in Egypt. The improvements mentioned earlier are realistic and are a vital part of creating an industry that just does not take from a country, but gives as well. These improvements can help change the self destructive form of tourism that is common in Egypt, with its disregard of people that do not contribute to it, or its lack of respect of the workers who do participate. But these problems of corruption, exploitation, and cultural destruction are typical of tourism in developing countries. These international movements of greed and exploitation should be addressed and dealt with, not ignored for one's convenience. It is this that brings up the question of whether tourism is sustainable, and whether it should be relied on by a country. And the verdict on Egypt is in. It is not sustainable, and a major change in world affair, out of the control of Egypt, could result in economic destruction, never mind the destruction at home of a nation's cultural heritage through such a high volume commercial enterprise. It is time for country's to recognize the kind of dependent and helpless relationship they have with tourism on the international scale and realize the risks associated with it. Mass charter tourism is great for the quick buck, but not to be a pillar of a nation. ...read more.

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