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Comparison between the Indus and modern society

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Introduction

In the cradle of south Asia, around 200 BC to 700 AD, there once flourished a civilization called the Indus. Their advancements are almost as equal to our modern technology in areas such as plumbing, housing and road planning. But how similar or different are they from our McDonald eating, computer gaming lives? A family, the placement of that family in society, the way they're treated if they are not a majority, what they believe in and what they thought of death; how different or similar were they to us? In our society, family only consists of the immediate family such as mom, dad, brother(s) and/ or sister(s), and maybe a pet. Family in the eyes of the Indus meant the whole community, which would have most likely included grandparents, uncles, aunts, cousins, everyone. We take for granted that we all have equal rights and the same opportunities. In the Indus valley, there is a sense of prejudice against females. A boy will be given a "threading" ceremony at the age of six and sent off to a school, funded by the king, to receive a "proper" education. Girls are also given and education, but they learn different things. ...read more.

Middle

For some of the unlucky few born into the under-castes, life was rough. If one was born into the Shudra caste, then your whole life was to be devoted to serving the other three "higher" castes; you were not allowed to listen in on religious readings, or touch sacred text. A Shudra was commonly identifies by their darker complexion. Some of the things you had to endure as a Shudra were, you were considered impure, you could only eat the leftovers from your "master's" table, wear his old clothes and use his old materials. 3 Our modern society works together to get people out of such situations instead of harvesting in on their pain and humiliation. We believe in philanthropy because we understand that no one wants to be in that position. This may be one of the best qualities of our society, our constant wanting to help others even if we can't help ourselves. We create programs, and donate money to causes to help those in a rough situation get back on their feet. Sadly, the Indus felt that they were just following what Brahman was telling them, something that was deeply rooted into their culture. ...read more.

Conclusion

Some have enough money to buy a piece of land to bury family, others choose cremation. There is no right or wrong, there is just do this or do that, it is all up to you. As difficult as it may seem, the Indus have meshed into many aspects of our society. Our society has incorporated many of the same values and practises the Indus once believed or conducted. Our societies merge when in comes to practises such as meditation, cremation, the belief in reincarnation for some, etc. that have become part of our culture. Simply put our modern culture/ society is a collaboration of the old and the new. The only question or concern now is how long will our new way last before it winds up with the same fate as the old? The End of a Great Civilization: the Indus and Our Modern Society Dao Dong 10H Tuesday June 6, 2006 Ms. Whitfield CHC2D7-01 1 Newman, Garfield, and Christine De Geer. Odyssey Through the Ages. CAN: McGraw Hill Ryerson Limited, 1992. 2 Quinlan, Don, et al. Exploring World Religions: The Canadian Perspective. Don Mills: Oxford University Press, 2001. 3 Auboyer, Jeannine. Early Life in Ancient India: From 200BC to 700AD. France: George Weidenfield and Nicolson Ltd., 1965. 4 Quinlan, Don, et al. Exploring World Religions: The Canadian Perspective. Don Mills: Oxford University Press, 2001 ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 ...read more.

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