• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Evaluating the effect of Cnadian internment camps for those of Japanese descent during WW2.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Part A - Plan of Investigation (Word Count: 167) Japanese internment camps were one of Canada's most controversial human rights violations of all time. They caused Caucasian Canadians to look negatively towards those of Japanese descent. The purpose of this investigation is to determine to what extent the withdrawal of human rights affect family life and cultural values of Japanese Canadian's between the year of 1939 and 1945. Its focus will be on what the Canadian Government did, the outcome, the repossession of the internees' property, communication and mobility barriers, and the relocation of the Japanese Canadians. In order to conduct this investigation, an assortment of primary and secondary sources will be used and analyzed to obtain past and present perspectives. An article consisting of primary reminiscences of Japanese women internees "Memories of Internment: Narrating Japanese Canadian Women's Life Stories" by Pamela Sugiman and the secondary source monograph Nikkei Legacy: The Story of Japanese Canadians from Settlement to Today by Toyo Takata will be analyzed for credibility to determine the reliability of the information provided. Part B - Summary of Facts (Word Count: 854) 1. The repossession of the internees' properties, created internal and financial struggles amongst families. * Hours after the attack on Pearl Harbour on December 8th, 1939 the government restricted trades with Japanese companies, freezing assets of Japanese investments.1 * Due to the escalating fear of traitors communicating with their homeland, the Caucasian community began circulating rumours which led to the RCMP's abrupt and relentless acts of destroying documents, fishing boats, photographs and religious belongs. ...read more.

Middle

He experienced the appalling conditions of Japanese internment camps firsthand as a child. After two years in a camp located in British Columbia, he relocated to Toronto and became the English editor of The New Canadian. He became an icon for the Japanese-Canadian community for creating the Japanese Canadian Centennial in 1977. It was published in 1983 in Toronto by NC Press Limited. Takata's purpose for writing this monograph is to break the silence of many Japanese internees' and to expose the abuse and human rights violation they endured. This secondary source is valuable to the investigation because it involves the extensive research of primary sources conducted by the author in order to capture all opinions into one source. It is organized into many chapters, which easily enables the reader to comprehend each concept. The limitation of the source is it does not allow the reader to get a quick overview of Japanese internment camps because of the detail given on each event. 2. . The article "Memories of Internment: Narrating Japanese Canadian Women's Life Stories" was written by Pamela Sugiman, a historian who earned her PhD in Sociology at the University of Toronto. She published many articles in a variety of Canadian journals, and is a professor at McMaster and Ryerson University. The article was published in 2004, in the Canadian Journal of Sociology; Vol.29, No. 3. The purpose of this article is to offer a primary viewpoint of internment camps and how women felt about the circumstances. ...read more.

Conclusion

Although there was no distinct evidence for the traitorous behaviour from the Japanese, the government was still legally able to withhold the Japanese Canadians before proving their guilt. Documents revealed that within the entire seven years of the entire seven years of exile, Japanese Canadians have not left a trace of evidence which holds themselves guilty for any type of traitorous activity nor behaviour.23 In addition, Japanese Canadians were only able to reside in boundaries the government approved.24 The requirement to ask for approval in order to go anywhere, is the basis foundation of freedom, however, the Japanese Canadians were stripped of this freedom. In spite of what the dominant Caucasian population thought at the time the denial of an individual's human rights is not a point of "merit" but "demerit." Part E - Conclusion (Word Count: 90) Throughout the development of Canada's political system there have been many negative influences on certain ethnicities based on international impacts such as imperialism. The Japanese were treated irrationally and unjust, dramatically crippled the culture of Japanese-Canadians by their separation from family, possessions and their familiar surroundings. Withdrawal from family influences causes an individual to lose connections with direct ties to ones culture and moralistic outlooks. Furthermore without the presence of these possessions, and direct family members, the alienation overcomes the individual and ruined the cultural values and family lives of a large number of Japanese citizens. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our International Baccalaureate History section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related International Baccalaureate History essays

  1. Interwar Years: 1919-39

    * The USSR and Germany promised each other that they would remain neutral in the event of either being attacked by a third power. * The three foreign ministers - Gustav Stresemann, Aristide Briand and Austen Chamberlain - were jointly awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1926.

  2. History Internal Assesment

    did not place any restrictions on oil, steel or coal suggesting that it was following the interests of Britain and France (not to provoke Italy into causing another war). Another value of this document is that it shows that although the U.S.

  1. Rwanda Genocide

    by giving them weapons and used their international power to let Hutus enter Tutsi refuge camps that were set by the Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) (newyorker, 8.Jan.2010), to murder them all. Within the refuge camps, another 50 thousand people have lost their lives.

  2. Investigacin Histrica: En qu medida la expropiacin de tierras emprendida durante el gobierno de ...

    como hacerse cargo de una gran cantidad de tierra que s�lo los oligarcas podr�an. No obstante, si lleg� a desaparecer la oligarqu�a terrateniente tal como lo menciona Pease: "La lucha pol�tica ha concluido una etapa: los "barones del az�car", n�cleo hegem�nico de la oligarqu�a desde fines del siglo pasado, han sido eliminados."

  1. Notes on the History and Development of the Arab-Israeli Conflict

    voted to cancel the clauses in the PLO covenant calling for the destruction of Israel. In return, Israel's Labour party abandoned the long-standing opposition to the formation of a Palestinian state. It also abandoned its claim that the Golan Heights were essential to Israel's security.

  2. Aboriginal Human Rights and Canadian History

    After the French and British engaged in decades of trade with First Nations, Métis, and Inuit peoples, such as the beaver pelt trade, the pemmican and bison meat trade, the whaling trade, and the sea-otter pelt trade, the market for these products eventually collapsed.

  1. The Anglo-Saxon Culture: An Overview

    The leader of the missionary effort sent by Rome to Kent to begin the con-version, Augustine, was an Italian, and the most important archbishop of Canterbury in the following decades, Theodore, was a Greek from Cilicia in Asia Minor. Pilgrimages were also important in exposing Anglo-Saxons to more developed cultures.

  2. Technological Developments Made During WW2

    With the use of penicillin, soldiers survived their wounds and infections and were able to return to battle, giving the Allies more manpower to defeat the Axis nations. The Axis powers failed to give a high enough priority to health and sanitation and it helped contribute to their defeat.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work