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Historical Investigation on The Establishment of Slavery in Saint Domingue and The United States

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Introduction

Kai Davids Schell Table of Contents A. Plan of Investigation......................................................................................... 2 B. Summary of Evidence....................................................................................... 2-3 C. Evaluation of Sources....................................................................................... 3 D. Analysis............................................................................................................... 3-4 E. Conclusion.......................................................................................................... 4 F. Bibliography....................................................................................................... 5 Plan of Investigation: This investigation plans to assess the reasons behind the establishment of slavery in the Southern North American colonies, and Saint Domingue. The reasons for the establishment of slavery within the two regions have their similarities compared, and their differences contrasted. The Encyclopedia of Latin American History and Culture Ed. Jay Kinsbruner and Erick D. Langer, and the Gale Encyclopedia of U.S. Economic History Vol. 2 Ed. Thomas Carson and Mary Bonk, are evaluated within this investigation in order to show their significance to slavery in the regions and for their limitations as accurate sources. Summary of Evidence: As settlers from Europe began to colonize North America, in the south especially, agriculture became a huge part of the local economies. At first, the scale of production was small enough that land owners could work their farms themselves and with the labor of indentured servants, and other poorer Europeans. Eventually however, more labor was required, and so began the importation of slaves from Africa and the Caribbean. ...read more.

Middle

Evaluation of Sources: The Gale Encyclopedia of U.S. Economic History Vol. 2 is a compilation of entries on the United States economy ranging from topics like slavery, to others about the prohibitions. The extract I used in this Investigation spanned from p926 to p929 entitled Slavery(Issue). This section, like the rest of the text, focused almost exclusively on the economic portion of the effects of slavery and the economic reasons behind the establishment of slavery. Because this source is an Encyclopedia, there is very little personal analysis present that could change the presented information based on the author's personal biases, making it reliable. However the choice in the facts presented in the text are fully subject to the author's biases yet cannot be seen so there is a margin of lacking in the material while not being visible must be taken into account. It is also written by two American authors, and therefore is influenced by the lens of current American culture. The Encyclopedia of Latin American History and Culture, Ed. Jay Kinsbruner and Erick D. Langer is a large compilation of historical events taking place in various parts of Latin America. The text spans from pre-European times all the way to the near present. ...read more.

Conclusion

slave labor on plantations is the fact that the people establishing it as well as planters were for the vast majority white. And while many whites had no problem using other poorer whites for labor they were unwilling to do, they saw Africans as a truly inferior race, fit only to serve them. This feeling of cultural, and even biological, superiority justified using Africans as slaves. And why would anyone oppose it? Slavery was, by their interpretation, even supported by the bible. The Africans who were captured were obviously not Christian, and so according to beliefs of the time, this made it all the more acceptable to capture and enslave them. Conclusion: Due to the its success regarding the plantation system, slavery became a fully established practice in both Saint Domingue and the North American colonies. With the establishment of slavery St. Domingue became the most profitable colony of its time, supported by its plantation economy, and the North American colonies grew to become one of the most successful nations in the world. Despite its opposition, the economic benefits of slavery, for the slave holder, were able to establish it into a trade that spanned the Atlantic, and a tradition that lasted hundreds of years and only with bloody revolution, retreated and disappeared. ...read more.

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