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Historical Investigation: To what extent did the Taiwanese population benefit from Japans agricultural developments during the Japanese colonial period, 1895~1945?

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Introduction

TAIPEI EUROPEAN SCHOOL To what extent did the Taiwanese population benefit from Japan's agricultural developments during the Japanese colonial period, 1895~1945? A Historical Investigation Candidate Number: 001407-038 Candidate Name: Eva Teng Word Count: 1981 Contents Page Section Page A: Plan of the Investigation 2 B: Summary of Evidence 3 C: Evaluation of Sources 6 D: Analysis 8 E: Conclusion 10 F: List of Sources 11 Appendix I Examples of Establishments vital for assisting agricultural growth 12 Appendix II Images of Taiwanese farmers oppressed by the Japanese 13 Appendix III Original text of source B 14 A. Plan of the investigation The aim of this investigation is to analyse the extent to which the Taiwanese population benefitted from Japan's economic development during the Japanese colonial period, 1895~1945. This topic was chosen because Taiwan's recent economic transformation has attracted attention from scholars, and being a Taiwanese citizen I hoped to gain a better understanding of what my ancestors experienced. First, a summary of the economic changes the Japanese made to improve Taiwan's economy will be given. The effects of these changes on the Taiwanese economy will be subsequently outlined. Then, the effects which the native Taiwanese felt as a result of the reforms will be outlined. The sources which will be analysed are data on the agricultural output between 1901~1945 compiled by Samuel Pao-San Ho and a translation of a newspaper extract on the effect of Japanese reforms on native Taiwanese, including the latter's feelings. An analysis will then be made on the effect of the development on the economy and on the feelings of the Taiwanese. ...read more.

Middle

However, it may be limited because the Taiwanese education was against the Japanese for a period of time. Thus, although this article corresponds to the community's beliefs, the beliefs themselves may be biased and thus limited. D. Analysis The series of economic reforms left a large impact on Taiwan. This is an important issue when one studies the effect of Japan's economic developments during the colonial period because it illustrates the extent to which Taiwan actually experienced the "improving" economy. The agricultural investments such as expanded irrigation certainly made agriculture more efficient and productive, and are reflected by the steady increase in production. Farming became easier and more efficient, and this resulted in increased production. On the surface it seems like the native Taiwanese benefited from Japan's economic developments because an increase in production should increase their income and thus life quality. The improved economy also increased the demand of more prestigious jobs, and this fact alone suggests that the natives were given more opportunities and wages. Also, many historians and economists studying the transformation that Taiwan had gone through in the last century attribute the fast development to the reforms of the Japanese. In fact, according to Immanuel C. Y. Hsu, "In East Asia, Taiwan is indeed second only to Japan in terms of industrialization, foreign trade, and quality of life" thanks to the "Economic Miracle" made possible by the Japanese reforms.18 In this sense, had the Japanese not given Taiwan its solid economic basis through the reforms, it is highly unlikely that the Taiwanese could have been liberated from economic hardship in relatively short time. ...read more.

Conclusion

Myers, Mark R. Peattie (1987). The Japanese colonial empire, 1895-1945. United States of America: Princeton University Press. 377. 9 Ramon H. Myers, Mark R. Peattie (1987). The Japanese colonial empire, 1895-1945. United States of America: Princeton University Press. 374. 10 The Taiwanese population "increased by 78 percent" during 1910~1940 (Ramon H. Myers, Mark R. Peattie (1987). The Japanese colonial empire, 1895-1945. United States of America: Princeton University Press. 359.) 11 "The export of rice from the colonies to Japan had reduced the annual per capita availability of rice from about 130kg to 100kg in Taiwan" (Ramon H. Myers, Mark R. Peattie (1987). The Japanese colonial empire, 1895-1945. United States of America: Princeton University Press. 379.) 12 Native Taiwanese switched from rice to sweet potato. Approximately 70% of their calorie intake was derived from this source (Samuel P. -S. Ho, Economic development of Taiwan, 1860~1970, New Haven: Yale University Press, 1978, Table 6.2) 13 Samuel P. -S. Ho, Economic development of Taiwan, 1860~1970, New Haven: Yale University Press, 1978, Table 6.2 14???. (2009). ???? ???????-??. Available: http://www.penghutime.com.tw/newsdata.php?no=09030257. Last accessed 07 September 2009. 15 See Appendix II 16 Samuel Pao-San Ho. (1968). Agricultural Transformation Under Colonialism: The Case of Taiwan. The Journal of Economic History. 28 (3), 313. 17Original text in Appendix III???. 18 Immanuel C. Y. Hsu (2000). The Rise of Modern China. 6th ed. New York: Oxford University Press. 904. 19 Ramon H. Myers, Mark R. Peattie (1987). The Japanese colonial empire, 1895~1945. United States of America: Princeton University Press. 37. 20?????. (2007). ????.?????????.Available: http://tw.myblog.yahoo.com/hurt633/article?mid=39212&sc=1. Last accessed 10 September 2009. 21???. (2009). ???? ???????-??. Available: http://www.penghutime.com.tw/newsdata.php?no=09030257. Last accessed 07 September 2009. ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 ...read more.

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