• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

History Investigation - Hitler

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How and to what lengths did Hitler take to rise to power as dictator between 1923 and 1933? History Internal Assessment: Historical Investigation Andrew Summers 19 June 2008 Word Count: 1999 Table of Contents: Part A Plan of Investigation 3 Part B Summary of Evidence 4 Part C Evaluation of Sources 7 Part D Analysis 9 Part E Conclusion 11 Part F List of Sources 12 A. Plan of the Investigation This investigation seeks to examine and evaluate the way in which Hitler rose to power in Germany. The main body of this investigation outlines how Hitler went from a mere man, to the powerful leader of Nazi Germany. Who influenced him will be examined, specifically paying attention to what encouraged him to step into politics and later lead a great nation during World War II. One source that will be used in this essay is "How did Hitler become a dictator?" written by author Jamie Burn, including sources directly from Adolf Hitler's - Mein Kampf. The second source that will be used in this investigation is "Hitler's rise to power, 1924 - 30" by author Alan Mendum. These two sources will then be evaluated in detail in terms of their origin, purpose, value and limitations. ...read more.

Middle

It discusses the events that led to Hitler's rise to power in a consecutive order. Reading this article, it is easy to follow as it starts with Hitler's imprisonment and how Hitler began to rebuild the Nazi party once he was released from prison. The election in 1928 reveals the Nazi's popularity once the voting was cast. The Wall Street crash and the Great Depression unveils the plummet of Germany's economy and how Hitler jumped at the chance to gain authority in promising prosperity and an end to the Great Depression. This article then describes how the Nazis achieved power at the polls thoroughly planned campaigns, propaganda, "flags, uniforms, slogans and carefully choreographed parades"14 and charismatic speeches. The strong armed forces and prejudices contributed in the intimidation of voters. Lastly, the article discusses specifically how the Nazis got into power, through the downfall of the Weimar Republic and the success of the Nazi party. The article is limited, however, in that it doesn't go into detail about the events leading the rise of Hitler, nor does it show the actual passages in Mein Kampf that were analyzed. The origin of the second source is a journal article written by Alan Mendum for Hindsight 17.1 on September 2006, found on page 28. ...read more.

Conclusion

The opposition against Hitler was feeble, divided and did not take the Nazi threat seriously until it was too late. National bodies, like churches, legal systems and armed forces, were concerned with themselves rather than the country at large. A considerable number of Germans voted for the Nazis thinking that it didn't matter who was in power, as long as they were able to get out of the mess that Germany found itself in. For many, to give up personal freedoms seemed a fair price to pay. The Nazis' promise to restore German pride was particularly appealing to a nation that had suffered the humiliation of defeat. Thus, resulting in Hitler's rise to power as dictator. Word Count: 1999 F. List of Sources Alan Mendum, "Hitler's rise to power in Germany, 1920-34," Hindsight, 17.1, (September, 2006), 28. Jamie Burn, "How did Hitler become a dictator? (Mein Kampf by Adolf Hitler)," Hindsight, 17.3, (April, 2007), 5. 1 Jamie Burn, "How did Hitler become a Dictator? (Mein Kampf)," Hindsight, 17.3, (April, 2007), 5. 2 Ibid. 3 Ibid. 4 Ibid. 5 Ibid. 6 Burn, "How did Hitler become a Dictator?", 5. 7 Ibid. 8 Ibid. 9 Ibid. 10 Ibid. 11 Alan Mendum, "Hitler's Rise to Power in Germany, 1920-34," Hindsight, 17.1, (September, 2006), 28. 12 Ibid. 13 Ibid. 14 Burn, "How did Hitler become a Dictator?", 4. 15 Mendum, "Hitler's Rise to Power in Germany, 1920-34," 28. 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our International Baccalaureate History section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related International Baccalaureate History essays

  1. History internal Assessment (The subsidiary role of women in Nazi society)

    On the other hand: Hitler's attempts (...) won some acceptance amongst German women, who found that, on balance, economic security and the motherhood cult more than compensated for sex discrimination24. Nevertheless, let us not forget the other part, who wanted to achieve something in the world and did not want

  2. The rise of Hitler and the Nazi party

    The S.A played a significant role in the Beer Hall Putsch, (1923), which acted as Hitler's first action, with the aim to take the Bavarian government and trigger national revolution and remove the Berlin government. The attempt of the government to in place some provisions of the Treaty had endangered

  1. What was the nature of opposition to Hitler and why did it achieve so ...

    Even though, there were some individual attempts to stop Hitler, active opposition was attempted by small scale groups that were limited to small circles as the large institutions that could have opposed the Nazis, such as political parties and Trade Unions had been smashed to form a Single Party State.

  2. The Depictions of the Holocaust in Night and Schindlers List

    Night and Schindler's s list gives a clear depiction of the means of the extermination. These two works describe the historical accuracy of how many Jews were gassed if they did not reach the requirements of the SS guard. They also told about how the many Jewish corpses were disposed of by the means of cremation.

  1. IB History HL, Extended Notes: Russia, the Tsars, the Provisional Govenment and the Revolution.

    A period of terror followed. Features 1. Bourgeoisie were driven from their homes, denied rations, and forced to do degrading work. They were also sometimes indiscriminately shot. 2. Felix Dzerzhinsky (Cheka?s founder) warned Lenin of the impending bloodbath and made clear that he wanted to seek out and destroy counter-revolutionaries 3.

  2. Was Hitler a Strong or Weak dictator?

    However the new government was truly brought down by the Great depression, which left a majority out of work and starving to death.

  1. Review Marwick's article "The Fundamentals of History", in so doing, defining what he regards ...

    The reason is that primary and secondary sources have different usage and we cannot learn much knowledge about the past from a single source. Primary sources are fragmentary and scarce, so they can contain errors and prejudice and are not edited.

  2. Notes on the history of Communist China

    rice the staple crop of 6/9 regions 3. products of China consisted of almost entirely agricultural commodities and handcrafted mfg 4.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work