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How did new developments contribute to the bloody drawn out nature of World War One?

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Introduction

How did new developments contribute to the bloody drawn out nature of World War One? Mathieu Boutet World War One came with many advances and changes never before seen in a war this large and which played a major role during the course of the conflict. Little did the people of Europe know that this would be one of the most catastrophic wars in the history of the earth with nearly eight million casualties. Progress and developments in, machine guns, chemical weaponry, and artillery were amongst the most deadly killers. In total, seventy percent of all casualties were solely due to heavy artillery weapons.1 The widespread use of trenches also played a role in making The Great War a war of attrition2 where the aim was to wear down the enemy in their manpower and resources in an effort to cripple them. ...read more.

Middle

For example, in the earlier Russo-Japanese war of 1904-1905, the use of Artillery contributed only a small ten percent of casualties.5 Thus, being that soldiers were simply getting slaughtered over and over again, army leaders were forced into finding ways to conduct the war avoiding these ever-constant deaths. The solution that armies came up with was the use of trenches. Originally trenches were used as shelters but then, the realisation came that they could be developed, and were, into a series of what seemed like endless chains.6 Though, what the commanders didn't know was that this would contribute unimaginably to the "drawn out nature of the conflict" by causing the track of the confrontation to veer on a course of attritional warfare. When the use of trenches first started to evolve they were supposed to be well organised and solidly built but as the war wore on they started to resemble muddy pits infested with rats and diseases causing many diseases ...read more.

Conclusion

It was a far larger and more powerful than any had ever seen with more armies being mobilised and thus, more deaths.9 Attrition was largely to blame for the mass number of deaths and also taking into consideration the weapons that forced this to come into play. 1 Chapter 5, Strategy: The Failure of the Plans, Stewart, Neil - The Changing Nature of Warfare; 1700-1945 2 Attrition Warfare - wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_of_attrition 3 Ben Walsh, GCSE Modern World History , London : , 2001, p. 23 4 Ben Walsh, GCSE Modern World History , London : , 2001, p. 21 5 Chapter 5, Strategy: The Failure of the Plans, Stewart, Neil - The Changing Nature of Warfare; 1700-1945 6 Ben Walsh, GCSE Modern World History , London : , 2001, p. 20 7 Trench Warfare - wikipedia.org, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trench_warfare 8 Ben Walsh, GCSE Modern World History , London : , 2001, p. 24 9 Chapter 5, Strategy: The Failure of the Plans, Stewart, Neil - The Changing Nature of Warfare; 1700-1945 ...read more.

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