• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

In order to establish the reasons for Hitlers rise to power the following are essential to consider; the economic and political situations of Weimer Germany during this period, the opposition of the Nazi party, the Nazis policies and Hitler as a lea

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Introduction: Hitler's rise to power, ending with the establishment of his dictatorship in July 1933, was a direct result of the conditions of the 1920's and early 30's and correlated with the methods and policies that he embraced as leader of the Nazi party, and chancellor of Germany in Jan 1933. In order to establish the reasons for Hitler's rise to power the following are essential to consider; the economic and political situations of Weimer Germany during this period, the opposition of the Nazi party, the Nazi's policies and Hitler as a leader. The Nazi program was incredibly influential in the early years of Hitler gaining support and his rise to power. The 25 point programme, made in 1920, consisted of 25 points of demands and beliefs of the party. Included in the manifesto, were issues that remained the same through the 1920's; for example, the revision of the treaty of Versailles, the ending of the reparations and the creating of a 'national community' for the German people. As the Nazi party was just starting out, it was important for them to attract as many different social classes as possible to broaden their chance of receiving more votes in elections. In February 1920, the Nazi party held a mass rally in which they announced their new programme, over 2,000 people attended which was a great improvement from the 25 people that attended Hitler's first meeting. ...read more.

Middle

As a result of this along with the reparations Germany had to pay, the German money system had broken down and had only reached 47% of pre-war production levels. Germany was relying on foreign loans, especially from America, which was known as 'Dawes Plan' , to help Germany recover the finialical losses. However, Germany's reliability on foreign aid increased the widespread resentment of the public. In addition to this, the Wall Street Crash of 1929 left Germany in a worse state with 6 million people unemployed by the beginning of the 1930s. The German public were discontent with how the government handled the economic crisis and as a result of this, Hiter was able to use this to his advantage to promise a way out of unemployment and gain support. The elimination of opposition to the Nazi party was one of Hitler's main methods to gain total power in Germany. As two of the major parties were loosing votes, theSocialist party from 8,2 million votes in September 1930 to 7.2 in November 1932 and the German Democractic party from 1,3 million votes in 1930 to 0.34 in 1932, Hitler saw their main opposing power was the Communist Party.(KPD) Apart from the Nazi party they were the only other party to increase in votes; in September 1930 they had 4.6 million votes compared to the 5.98 million votes in November 1932. ...read more.

Conclusion

In addition to propaganda and the SA, Hitler himself was an incredibly influencial leader and his charismatic personality contributed to his rise in power. During elections, he was seen to be the only leader to fly around Germany to give speeches to the German public. Almost all of the Nazi parties campaign funds were spent on flying Hitler around Germany however, this successfuly resulted in an increase in seats in the Reichstag; in November 1932 the Nazi party had 230 seats compared to some of it's opposing parties such as the Communists with only 89 and the Centre party with only 75. Hitler's use of what he had and his own skills impacted his own rise to power as he knew what his own strengths were and used them to his own advantage. The individual methods that Hitler used and the conditions that Germany was in at the period of time helped Hitler's rise to power. The political and economic weaknesses of the Weimar Republic formed the foundations for Hitler's rise to power. Although, the success of Hitler's rise to power also has to consider the fact that the Nazi party's ideology and aims were appealing to the German public. Hitler also effectively took advantage of the use of propaganda and also his own potential as an influential leader. position ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our International Baccalaureate History section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related International Baccalaureate History essays

  1. Compare and contrast Mussolini's and Hitler's rise to power

    Much of the actions of Mussolini and Hitler centered on coercion, and the use of this as a method in acquiring power.

  2. How did the Nazis establish a dictatorship in Germany?

    The only party left with little chance to change the situation was the SPD. The SPD tried to remain in some control and influence of Hitlers government voted in support for Hitlers foreign policy. It was not long until the 22nd of June when the SPD was outlawed.

  1. Evaluate the successes and failures of one ruler of a single party state: Hitler's ...

    Synthetic substitutes for oil and rubber were to be made. Hitler failed on two accounts on his economic policies. By 1935 the 'Guns or Butter?' crisis meant that Germany could not afford both to import food and import industrial raw material.

  2. Castro's rise to power

    By saying he will deal with problems such as land distribution, putting an end to the corruption and ruthlessness of Batista's government he slowly started growing more and more supporters from the agrarian portion of the population and the middle-classes.

  1. The rise of Hitler and the Nazi party

    to Allied countries or face the continuance of war. Germans were horrified and many were fiercely against the signing of the treaty. However the government knew that Germany would not be able to deal politically, socially or economically with the continuation of war.

  2. Mao and China Revision Guide

    - In-accordance with the GLF goals of permitting "the masses to make themselves masters of science and technology" and eliminating the distinction between mental and manual labor. - Regular six-year primary schools and three-year middle schools were expanded in the rural areas under the administration of the communes so as

  1. To what extent were Stalins economic policies successful up to 1940?

    Stalin?s goal were ambitious and he planned to expand production of the heavy industry by 300%.[16] The proposal and running of the Five Year Plan allowed many workers to gain jobs in certain fields of industry. Since Stalin wanted an increase of 300% in production, the building of new factories,

  2. Opposition in Nazi Germany

    Although the Gestapo (secret state police) and the Security Service suppressed open criticism of the regime, there was some German opposition to the Nazi state and the regimentation of society that took place through various opposition groups and such as The White Rose Movement, The Churches and opposition from the Nazi Army.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work