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Political, Economic, Social organizations of the New World

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Introduction

Prompt: Compare the political, economic, and social organization of two New World Colonies. During the colonial period countless issues arose. Whether it had to do with politics, economy, or society each colony had its own means of dealing with concerns, some better than others. As evident today, New Britain handled issues more successfully than New Spain for the most part. In terms of politics, although they it wasn't at all what they sought after, New Britain prevailed, as America is the most democratic nation in our country today. In terms of economy however, Britain had a small amount of control in contrast to New Spain's strictly enforced policies, although this is not shown today. In terms of society, although not today, the lifestyle of the lower class in New Spain was better off than that of New Britain. The political structure of New Spain, the former Spanish possessions in the Western Hemisphere, and that of New Britain, the former English possessions in the Western Hemisphere, were different in many ways, but some certain aspects paralleled each other. New Britain seems to be quickly on the road towards democracy, while New Spain appears to be stuck under a monarch and tight control of the church. A democratic government is a form of government by the people, either directly or through elected representatives. A monarch is a sole and absolute ruler of a state or nation, in this care King Ferdinand. With Columbus's repeated promises of Gold for King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella, the political intentions of New Spain were originally solely to ensure maximum profit and gold for the nation. ...read more.

Middle

The triangular trade was a trading pattern that developed - the New Britain colonies traded rum to England, England traded guns to Africa, Africa traded slaves to the West Indies, and the West Indies traded sugar used in rum to New Britain. The need for slaves became huge in New Spain. From 1502 to 1870 nine million slaves were imported, and 85% of these were involved with agriculture. On the other hand, most of New Britain's slavery involvement was different, with their roles varied from rum distillers to merchants to farmers. However, the Southern colonies' slavery conditions paralleled that of New Spain, in that the Southern Colonies' economy was based solely on agriculture, tobacco and sugar in particular. So as in the West Indies, the Southern Colonies were rich in plantations. This meant that they were in need of slaves in order to speed up production. Although they weren't commonly brought directly from Africa though triangular trade, there were many African slaves present. While both nations shared the same goal of colonization and the idea of a mercantilist government, they went about different their ways of involvement and control over the colonies. There are three basic aspects that shape a mercantilist economy - real wealth is measured in gold and silver, a nation must export more good than it imports, and that overseas empires are central. This means that the colonies exist to benefit the mother country, and that colonies will serve as a market for manufactured goods of the mother country. ...read more.

Conclusion

This would lead to a very unorganized rebellion. In conclusion to this, it is evident that slaves in Virginia were very poorly off compared to those of Cuba. The role of religion and religious toleration in New Spain was very different than New Britain. In New Spain the monarch strictly imposed Christianity upon the colonizers and the natives. Missionaries were sent out to convert the natives to Christianity, while colonizers were required to follow the Christian faith. The Europeans used the encomienda system in New Spain in order to Christianize the Indians. The encomienda system regulated the number of Indians living in a particular area. This allowed for no crowded areas, and in turn made it easier for the missionaries to convert the Indians. New Britain, on the other hand, found religious toleration when the Quakers, a group of German Christians, brought their simple views to the Middle Colony state of Pennsylvania. The Quakers greatly enhanced the acceptance and toleration of religion and natives. Another example of religious toleration in New Britain was seen with Lord Baltimore, Maryland's founder and ruler. Baltimore created an atmosphere in which Catholics and Protestants could live together. This shows that New Britain was way more advanced in terms of religious toleration and acceptance than New Spain, who seemed to lack a spokesperson. In the greater scheme of things, New Spain and New Britain colonies claimed different accomplishments. New Spain attained short term respect with it's strictly enforced mercantilist policies and government. New Spain accomplished what they sought after. New Britain, on the other hand, gained the obvious long term realization of becoming arguably the most dominant nation in our world today. ...read more.

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