• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The American Declaration of Independence and the views of the Loyalists.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

American History Editorial Topic: The Declaration of Independence Name: Abhijit Kambalapally Student Number: 685370 Course Code: CHA 3U8 Date: February 22, 2010 Word count: 456 words Abhijit Kambalapally The Apostasy of the "Patriots" The Second Continental Congress officially adopted the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. The document announced that the thirteen colonies of America declare themselves as independent states and are no longer a part of their motherland, the British Empire1. The reasons mentioned for independence were that King George III established an absolute tyranny over the colonies and has violated his own principles by imposing direct taxes on the colonies. In the document, the powerful words such as, "abuses and usurpations", have been used to show that the King was responsible for every hardship experienced by the unfaithful colonists who call themselves "Patriots"2. ...read more.

Middle

According to the loyalists, the taxes which were levied on the colonists were fairly acceptable. The British Empire was in a huge debt and slipped into an economic crisis after fighting the French and the Native Indians. The French-Indian War was fought only to protect the colonists to ensure their safety, freedom and happiness. When the British asked the colonists financial help by imposing reasonable amount of taxes on the colonists compared to its other territories around the world, the loyalists took this as a chance to serve their motherland. They considered this taxation reasonable and were ready to save their motherland from the verge of bankruptcy. On the other hand, the so called "patriots" betrayed the British Empire by declaring their independence and saying that the King was a "tyrant" depriving them of the rights of "life, liberty and pursuit of happiness"3. ...read more.

Conclusion

They have been imprisoned for supporting the British Empire and some of them have even been brutally tarred and feathered. Yet, they have proved their loyalty as 60 000 of them have become soldiers in favor of the British4. As the last alternative for peace, the loyalists have decided to leave this traitorous land and to migrate to Canada where they can live in loyalty to the British Empire. Endnotes 1 Boorstin, Daniel, and Brooks Kelley. "The Road to Revolution and Victory." In A History Of The United States. Needham, Massachusetts: Prentice hall, 2002. 84-98. 2 Kindig, Thomas. "The Declaration of Independence." ushistory.org. http://www.ushistory.org/declaration/document/ (accessed February 17, 2010). 3 Kindig, Thomas. "The Declaration of Independence." ushistory.org. http://www.ushistory.org/declaration/document/ (accessed February 17, 2010). 4 Boorstin, Daniel, and Brooks Kelley. "The Road to Revolution and Victory." In A History Of The United States. Needham, Massachusetts: Prentice hall, 2002. 84-98. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our International Baccalaureate History section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related International Baccalaureate History essays

  1. Did Truman really save 500,000 American live through dropping the Hiroshima atomic bomb?

    5. Chun, Clayton, and John White. Japan 1945: From Operation Downfall to Hiroshima and Nagasaki. 1st ed. 1vol. USA: Osprey Publishing, 2008. Print. 6. Costello, John. The Pacific War. 1st ed. 1 vol. USA: Harper Perennial, 1982. Print. 7.

  2. The United States War of Independence had nothing in common with the Latin American ...

    The ministry then passed the Navigation Acts. "The Navigation Acts, created between 1660 and 1760 by the British Parliament, exemplify mercantilism's policies. The Acts forbade English trade on anything but English vessels in English ports and commodities made within the colonies (like sugar and tobacco)

  1. Davy Crockett, one of Americas best known folk heroes, the frontiersman from Tennessee who ...

    So Davy took off running and didn't stop. He went back to Virginia, doing farm work which paid 25 cents a day. After he had saved seven dollars he headed to Baltimore to see the sea.

  2. The History and Development of the American Dream

    Manifest Destiny Manifest Destiny was an American doctrine first coined by the journalist John O?Sullivan.The meaning of the phrase was the inevitable destination of the American nation to expand on the continent. Manifest Destiny also had consequences for the Native Americans as their land was occupied by the new settlers.

  1. Notes on the History and Development of the Arab-Israeli Conflict

    - Not just their reputation was damaged - some Arab states withdrew economic and political support for the PLO as a result, imposing economic sanctions on the Palestinians in the OTs. 250,000 Palestinian workers were expelled from the Gulf States.

  2. The United States' pursuit of Pancho Villa jeopardized American security to such an extent ...

    Part D: The advances that the Germans had made left them with nowhere to expand, except toward the Western hemisphere, which was home to none other than the United States of America. As the unrestricted submarine warfare policy was restored, these threats were increased and left the United States of America defenceless to such technology and tactics.

  1. A look at the Differing Views of Jimmy Hoffa by the Government, the Public, ...

    Hoffa?s power and influence within the Teamsters would continue to grow. The membership of the Teamsters would grow to 544,247 by 1941. During this time, Hoffa and his Detroit Teamsters competed relentlessly and fought violently with unions of the Congress of Industrial Organizations, such as the United Dairy Workers and United Brewery Workers (Russell 58-95).

  2. Major Events and Individuals in the Subjugation of the American Indians

    Custer led a battalion of 200 men into the camp site and after the final attack led by General George Armstrong Custer everyone including General Custer was dead. This was the last victory for the Sioux. Wovoka- Wovoka was a Paiute who created a dance and religious movement know as the Ghost Dance.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work