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The Ku Klux Klan: Restoration of Old Southern Order During Reconstruction

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Introduction

The Ku Klux Klan: Restoration of Old Southern Order During Reconstruction The Ku Klux Klan, a terrorist rebel group killed hundreds and performed many acts of violence and hate throughout the years of its existence during the period of reconstruction, rife with problems and rebellion. The Ku Klux Klan succeeded in protecting and reinstituting most of the old social, economical, religious, political ways of the former Confederate states. The effect of the Ku Klux Klan in the south during reconstruction is sometimes brought into question due to the fact that the Federal government may not have accurately reporting what the effect of the Klan on southern society was during reconstruction, since the Klan was an 'invisible empire.'1 All the personalities, politics, organizations, legislation, ideas, incidents, exploitations and the power struggles that constituted reconstruction are cumulative to the total effect of the fraternal Ku Klux Klan in the glorified early days of battling reconstruction. All the transformations underwent such as the takeover by general Nathan Bedford Forest and the disbanding of the first incarnation that formed the true nature of the Klan as a fraternal terrorist organization2 in all aspects of its goals. The purpose is to be a chronicling attempt to show what happened during the constant changes and turmoil that took place during the confusing events that unfolded during the radical and non-radical taper of the Republican reconstruction era. The economic situation proved to be dismal in all ways that the word dismal could describe something after the civil war in the former Confederate States of America, since the war ravaged the land and laid waste to all industry and sustenance with the Bureau of Freedmen3 adding insult to injury. Because of the continuous nature of the civil war and the widespread marching through and burning of the south resulted in the decimation of all crops and the inability to use the land for any use whatsoever in the southern areas of the united states that were then under division into Federal military districts. ...read more.

Middle

By the end of 1872, the Federal crackdown had broken the back of the KKK. Due to the restrictions and the Acts passed violence was isolated but still continued by the Klan in the former Confederate States of America. The KKK was dead, and Reconstruction lived on in southern legend. The attributes of the Republican reconstruction era left the United States of America a country with essentially only one party and no ability for the southern whites to express themselves on a state and Federal level due to military rule of the south and an invincible Republican majority in the north. The social atmosphere of the southern united states was a fairly unique one throughout all stages of Federal reconstruction from beginning to end having racial and political divides creating a setup for eventual violence and struggle for dominance in a situation where it was sometimes difficult to tell whether the south was really under the control of the Federal government or the former Confederates. The leadership of America was convoluted just like the eventual social and organizational structure of the Klan whilst advancing through reconstruction. The Ku Klux Klan, as it is known today, was started in the spring of 1866, by six Confederate veterans formed a social club in Pulaski, Tennessee, which was a former northerly Confederate state. This gave the forming of the Klan a good time and place to make an appearance in its early stages as a type of theological club amongst childhood friends that had been in the Confederate army during the civil war27. The Klan was a very small group that was shrouded in much secrecy at first, but despite it all, the six KKK members initiated new members to join their social club. The early Klan quickly evolved into a social group and a type of fraternal order that set the stage to create an occasion where a group of Klansmen would go out and play non-violent pranks and just have fun in general during the ...read more.

Conclusion

17 Patsy Sims, The Klan (New York, NY: Stein and Day, 1978), 92. 18 William Richter, The ABC-CLIO Companion to American Reconstruction (Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, 1996), 245. 19 Ibid, 246. 20 Ibid. 21 Ibid. 22 William Richter, The ABC-CLIO Companion to American Reconstruction (Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, 1996), 246. 23 Ibid. 24 Ibid. 25 Ibid. 26 Patsy Sims, The Klan (New York, NY: Stein and Day, 1978), 96. 27Patsy Sims, The Klan (New York, NY: Stein and Day, 1978), 95. 28 Craig Wade, The Fiery Cross: The Ku Klux Klan in America (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 1998), 40. 29 Fred Cook, The Ku Klux Klan: America's Recurring Nightmare (New York, NY: J. Messner, 1989), 23. 30 Alan Axelrod, The International Encyclopaedia of Secret Societies and Fraternal Orders (New York, NY: Facts on File, 1997), 159. 31 David Chalmers, Hooded Americanism: The History Of The Ku Klux Klan (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1987), 111. 32 Craig Wade, The Fiery Cross: The Ku Klux Klan in America (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 1998), 33. 33 William Richter, The ABC-CLIO Companion to American Reconstruction (Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, 1996), 244. 34 Milton Meltzer, The Truth About The Ku Klux Klan (New York, NY: Franklin Watts, 1982), 6. 35 William Richter, The ABC-CLIO Companion to American Reconstruction (Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, 1996), 244. 36 William Richter, The ABC-CLIO Companion to American Reconstruction (Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, 1996), 244. 37 Craig Wade, The Fiery Cross: The Ku Klux Klan in America (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 1998), 34. 38 Alan Axelrod, The International Encyclopaedia of Secret Societies and Fraternal Orders (New York, NY: Facts on File, 1997), 159. 39 David Chalmers, Hooded Americanism: The History Of The Ku Klux Klan (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1987), 394. 40 David Chalmers, Hooded Americanism: The History Of The Ku Klux Klan (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1987), 103. 41 Alan Axelrod, The International Encyclopaedia of Secret Societies and Fraternal Orders (New York, NY: Facts on File, 1997), 160. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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