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The North Carolina Observer September 1857. The S.S Central America capsized off the coast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina on September 12 on one of its many voyages to New York. The Central America, originally named the S.S George Law, was operated by

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Introduction

The North Carolina Observer September 1857 S.S. Central America Capsizes Bad Economy to Follow Charlestown, North Carolina...The S.S Central America capsized off the coast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina on September 12 on one of its many voyages to New York. The Central America, originally named the S.S George Law, was operated by the United States Postal Service. It was a three-masted, 272 foot long steamship that made 43 trips between San Francisco and New York before it sank. The ship was carrying 476 passengers, 102 crew members, approximately 35,000 letters, and over 3 tons of gold. Of the 578 people on the ill-fated ship only 152 people, mostly women and children, survived. On September 3, the ship left Aspinwall, Panama. The cargo included roughly 5,200 freshly minted $20 gold denominations that were produced at the San Francisco Mint. ...read more.

Middle

The ship was tossed about the waves, but it continued on its course. The card playing, reading, and further jollity came to and end as many of the passengers became seasick. The conditions were tough, but most of the passengers and crew expected the rough seas to end by the morning. The expected tranquility never came. By daybreak that Thursday, the conditions had worsened by a lot. "The wind was screaming and the waves crashed relentlessly into the boat," said Howes another surviving member of the Central America "We all kept below the deck, none of us wanted to get wet." The S.S Central America was in the middle of a furious hurricane, that wanted nothing more than to destroy the ship. The steamboat, kept afloat that night but that was all it could do. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Central America continued taking on water. The cabin walls began to rip apart. "The many people remaining on the ship and I pulled up the ships boards and railings trying to create makeshift rafts. We were literally clinging onto our lives," said Mr. Easton. The S.S Central America clung to its life until a few minutes past eight that night, says sources, until a massive wave hit the hull. She quavered and her timbers broke. Then, she slid into the water taking lives and a fortune down with her. The money lost in this ship wreck will cost investors and the United States government a little over a million dollars in lost goods. This loss has shaken the confidence of the public in a time with an already damaged economy. This sinking could have a perverse effect on this country's economy and spin us into an economic downfall. ...read more.

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