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The Revolutionary - A study of the Marquis the Lafayette and his involvement in the American and French revolutions

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Introduction

The Revolutionary - A study of the Marquis de Lafayette and his involvement in the American and the French revolution Zack Lindahl Content Introduction ......................................................................... 2 A Frenchman in the New World................................................. 3 - The Battle of Brandywine............................................................. 3 - The Battle of Yorktown - The End of the American Revolution.................... 3 Liberty, Equality and Fraternity.................................................4 - Liberal Politics.........................................................................4 - Revolution!.....................................................................................................5 Analysis................................................................................6 Source Listing & Source Criticism...............................................7 Introduction The ideas about democracy and liberalism, which is such a cornerstone in the modern society dates back to the ancient Greeks. However, it was but 300 years ago that these ideas started to have a serious impact upon society. The European world was the first to be introduced to the idea of liberalism during the Enlightenment of the 18th century. During this era, the opinions about democracy and freedom were manifest in two major events, namely the American and the French revolution. Many men became prominent historical figures during this era. The most famous of these are; George Washington, Maximilliam Robespierre and Louis XVI. These people are written about in the history books for their involvement in one of the revolutions. There is, however, a well-know historical figure who was not involved in just one of the revolutions, but both. ...read more.

Middle

He scrutinized the corrupt and stagnated economy of France, and then sent in a formal complaint to the King; Louis XVI. In the complaint he accused the court for squandering tax money and also attacked the whole tax-system. It was miraculous that the Marquis did not get sent to the Bastille, in fact, he was not punished at all. He was, however, disdained by the whole court, and was often called "the American", due to his constant reference to the American system and its proclaimed democratic superiority. As time went by, the Assembly of Notables struggled to govern France. Someone suggested that the Estate Generale should be called together, but many conservatives opposed this. Lafayette supported the proposition and also said that a new tax-system that was entirely run by the state, also, he suggested that a National Assembly should be formed. These were revolutionary ideas, and the Assembly of Notables was stunned. His actions made marked him an enemy of the King, and Lafayette was dismissed from his prestigious status in the army. 6 Revolution! Things started to move very fast for Lafayette, and for the whole of France. He was narrowly voted into the Noble Estate, even though the Third Estate offered to vote for him as their candidate. ...read more.

Conclusion

This is a document that will forever be remembered in the history of France. Lafayette made a permanent mark upon the world, and that was the teachings of liberty, equality and brotherhood. By this, Lafayette greatly affected the French Revolution. By trying to enforce the ideas of liberty, equality and brotherhood into an absolutist society, he was a true believer of democracy. We owe the free world we live in today to men like him. He was truly a revolutionary man. Source Listing & Source Criticism www.marquisdelafayette.net Lafayette by William E. Woodward, Vepe F�rlag, Stockholm 1939 It should be noted, that the information about Lafayette was contradicting at times. This might be due to an inaccuracy in the history webpage, but it might also be due to Woodward's personal bias for the Marquis de Lafayette in his book. The book is, although it contains unnecessary romantization of Lafayette, much more detailed and in-depth, and was preferred over the website. Be wary, as any source containing information about the Marquis de Lafayette should be cross-checked with another source. 1 Full name being Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier de Lafayette. Lafayette, William E. Woodward, Vepe f�rlag, 1939, Stockholm, Introduction 2 www.marquisdelafayette.net 2006-05-05 3 Ibis 2006-05-13 4 Lafayette, William E. Woodward, Chapter 8 5 Lafayette, William E. Woodward p. 154-157 6 Ibis p.179-183 7 Lafayette, William E. Woodward Chapter 16-17 8 www.marquisdelafayette.net 2006-05-18 ?? ?? ?? ?? 2 ...read more.

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