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The rise of Hitler

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Introduction

History Assignment -Nadia Nooreyezdan Grade 12 Q1. To what extent was the rise to power of one right wing, single party ruler, the result of previous political problems? A1. January 1933 marked Hitler's appointment as Chancellor and his subsequent disruption of the precautious balance in Europe, finally resulting in the cataclysmic World War II. However, one must question Hitler's unsteady rise to power, a combination of convenient circumstances as well as his own strategies, and which could be more predominant. It is believed that a series of circumstances contributed greatly to Hitler's sudden popularity and appointment as Chancellor, that he had little or no hand in. With Germany nearing defeat in the First World War, the Kaiser, in an effort to gain US support, put up the puppet Prince of Baden, which did not convince US to sign any treaty. For neutral US help Germany needed to establish a democracy which came to be known as the Weimar Republic. With the establishment of the Weimar, came an array of political groups ranging from radical leftist groups like the Social Democrats (SPD) and the KPD to centre and moderate left and right parties like DDP, Centre and DVP, to extreme right wingers such as the DNVP and the NSDAP. Different coalitions were formed between these parties that led to clash of ideologies. Along with this, the KPD and NSDAP both worked separately to bring down the republic. Apart from inter-party issues, the Weimar faced two major crises between 1919 and 1923. ...read more.

Middle

The downfall of the Weimar, and disintegration of democracy, along with the intrigue of Papen, would be of no consequence to Hitler, had he not acquired the popularity that he did by 1933 thanks to his change in strategy post Munich Putsch. Hence previous political problems did help in Hitler's rise to power to a certain extent, however, it was Hitler who took advantage of the situation, taking steps to ensure that once previous political problems consumed Germany, he could step up and lead his country to victory. Q2. Evaluate the role of ideology in the policies of one right wing, single party ruler, where social organization was concerned. A1. Nazi philosophy consists of many basic concepts and principles that Hitler and his followers were firm believers in. One can easily see how, taking control of the media, education system, etc the Nazi philosophy was systematically being indoctrinated among the German people. Hitler believed in the Social Darwinism theory which promulgates the survival of the fittest in nature where not only physically fit, but mentally, emotionally and ethically, people, or rather races survive. If you have inferior races intermingling with Aryan blood then the future generations will be weak and the state will degenerate. Hence Hitler wanted to organize the entire German nation on the basis of racial purity, or Volk- Gemein-Schaft. The Deutschland glorified meant that the Fatherland of Germany was glorified above all others and above all classes, thereby denying any existence of class struggles. ...read more.

Conclusion

Journalists too received guidelines from the DNB as well as detailed instructions and censorship if those instructions were not followed. The Nazi system also affected the Jews in a big way. Before 1940, the anti-Semitic persecution aimed at exclusion of Jews from society. They were not allowed to hold positions of importance such as positions in the military, civil service, judiciary and medical sciences. They were also prevented from marrying Germans as according to social Darwinism, the pure Aryanic blood would be contaminated. By 1940, Jews were confined to ghettos and deprived of German citizenship, ordered to wear the Star of David and their whereabouts known at all times. The 'Final Solution' was drawn up in 1941 that was permanent removal of the Jews by 'extermination'. Mass deportation of Jews took place as they were sent away to concentration camps. Along with these, homosexuals, gypsies, colored people and religious people were sent to concentration camps as they were either 'social deviants' or people who did not succumb to the Nazi ideologies. Hence we see how the thoughts and ideals that made up the Nazi Philosophy was translated into policies that were carried out all over Germany, having either an effect of indoctrination or rebellion. Hitler and his subordinates made full use of the instruments of propaganda and education, organized the working classes as well as families, had control over the journalists and teachers as well as set up groups for recreational activities for youth. Finally, the social Darwinism theory and the belief in the supremacy of the Aryanic traditions prevailed at the cost of thousands of lives. ...read more.

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