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The Treaty of Versailles vs. The Treaty of Vienna. Both the Congress of Vienna, headed by Klemens von Metternich of Austria after the Napoleonic Wars, and the Paris Peace Conference, which was held after the Great War, resulted in treaties that were aimed

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Introduction

One Song and Two Different Singers During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, several major conferences among world's powers were held with the intention of preserving peace. Both the Congress of Vienna, headed by Klemens von Metternich of Austria after the Napoleonic Wars, and the Paris Peace Conference, which was held after the Great War, resulted in treaties that were aimed to keep the peace, but they were ineffective to a comparable extent. The Treaty of Vienna was more successful than the Treaty of Versailles because it did a better job in avoiding a major war about a century, which was five times longer than the other treaty; created equal power amongst the European countries, and prevented the French belligerence in a peaceful manner rather than a destructive one unlike the Treaty of Versailles. The initial goals of both treaties were to suppress French and German aggressions, respectively. The Treaty of Vienna substantiated the "balance of power" throughout Europe and it had a success stopping the French aggression because of its friendly attitude towards France. The Treaty of Versailles, however, did not quite establish the true peace within European nations; but carried a sense of peace for a short period of time. Though its initial goal was stopping German aggression it failed to achieve it. ...read more.

Middle

In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries the European powers signed many alliances depending on their interests and goals. Triple Entente, consisting of Great Britain, France and Russia; and Triple Alliance, consisting of Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Italy were the most important alliances. Later on they would, more or less, form the Allied Powers and the Central Powers, respectively; with some additional countries when they were entering into World War One (WWI) in 1914. Although in the beginning there were only European countries fighting; it was called world war, because there would be involvement of countries outside of Europe such as United States and Japan. The world had never seen a war like before... Maybe, it was one of the bloodiest wars in the human history. Millions of people died, wounded; hundreds of towns and cities were destroyed to bits. At the end of WWI many treaties were signed with the defeated side, which was the Central Powers. Treaty of Versailles was signed in 1919 between Germany and the Allied Powers (representatives from France, United States, Great Britain and Italy), and was the harshest peace treaty of the war. Germany had to accept the guilt for the war, the treaty restricted German army to 100,000 troops with no submarines or airplanes, had to pay huge payments for all the damage of the war, lost many territories and her colonies, and the most bizarre thing was that Germany had not even invited to the conference. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Treaty of Versailles and the Treaty of Vienna were two controversial documents. The Treaty of Vienna placed importance to the benefits of the European societies. The representatives did not ignore France, but made her part of their alliance. The representatives aimed to establish and maintain peace in Europe without causing to any revengeful feeling of France. The friendly policy of the victorious powers in Vienna towards France encouraged the equality among European nations and it was achieved. On the other side of the coin, the representatives at Versailles purposed the weakening of Germany and they did that as cruelly as they could. Consequently, Germany would not have the strength to recover from such hard condition and would not able to start a war once again. In this manner, the representatives believed they had achieved the everlasting peace but they have missed an important point... This point is revolutionary ideas of Russia, which would inspire the German society and lead to another major war. This proves the delegates at Versailles had made a mistake in carrying out their policies. Their policy could only avoid a big war for twenty years, which is five times less than the accomplishment at Vienna. Thus, the Treaty of Vienna is more successful than the Treaty of Versailles. The dissimilarities in the Treaty of Versailles and the Treaty of Vienna were huge that they outshone the representatives' efforts to prosper their intentions. ...read more.

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