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To What Extent Can It Be Said That 20th Century Wars Are Not Caused By One Country Only?

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Introduction

To What Extent Can It Be Said That 20th Century Wars Are Not Caused By One Country Only? In 1919, the Treaty of Versailles placed all war guilt for the First World War upon Germany and no other countries were found to be even partially responsible for it. It stated that Germany was the only country to have triggered it by encouraging Austria to attack Serbia and had to accept full responsibility for the damages of war. However, as well as it can be argued that such was the right decision, it is also discussed that other countries, or even all countries involved share the blame. A German historian, Fischer, studied German archives, focusing on important figures. He concluded that Germany was prepared for the war in order to become a greater power and encouraged Austria-Hungary to go to war with Serbia, even though it was known that other countries other than the two would be involved. ...read more.

Middle

For example, Britain could focus its economy on the war, as there were many other countries from which they could get money. However, Germany did not have such resources and its wish to expand and equal Britain and France would evidently cause turbulence. Imperialism, a country's wish to have lands subject to their rule was also a cause of the First World War. While it may be said that it was Germany's desire to become imperialist by taking over colonies and European lands that motivated it into the war, countries such as Britain and France may also share the blame for being imperialist in first place, as Lenin said. He disagreed with the idea of a country "owning" another, and felt that European countries lust for power caused the constantly threatening atmosphere in the continent. Nationalism, which nowadays may be seen as a good thing to a country had a different meaning in the beginning of the 20th century. ...read more.

Conclusion

He suggests that Germany bluffed when encouraging Austria-Hungary to go to war with Serbia, thinking that the Russians would not protect it, and began the First World War. As Fischer argued, Germany caused the First World War and also influenced Hitler do repeat the process years later with the same expansionist aims. However, there is much criticism to his thesis in that it was incomplete and focused only on Germany and no other countries' role in the outbreak of war was considered. Even though it can be argued that Germany was the main country responsible for the war, every possible cause for it discussed involves another country's co-operation or rivalry, making it extremely hard to blame one single country for the war, even though it may seem the easiest thing that needs to be done. History is many times written by the winners, which seems to be the case, as Germany alone could not have been responsible for all causes of the war. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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