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Treaty Versailles Essay

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Introduction

The Treaty of Versailles Laurie Chan In 1914 a world war initiated. It was supposed to be the war to end all wars but instead it was a war that demolished millions of lives, left many people without families that they used to have, and caused hatred that lasted for generations.1 After 4 years of destruction, an armistice was signed in 1918 to end the war until a peace treaty was agreed upon.2 Without options Germany had to sign the treaty or their country would immediately encounter invasion.3 On the 28th of June 1919, two Germans were forced to sign the peace treaty, in the Hall of Mirrors in the palace of Versailles, near Paris.4 The Treaty of Versailles was intended to be a peace agreement between the Allies and the Germans but instead it ended up causing more problems than it solved because it left Germany very poor, angry and ready for revenge. World War I was started by a number of aspects but sparks of anger flew when the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand happened. Archduke Franz Ferdinand was heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne in Sarajevo. He was killed by Gavrilo Princip. Austria-Hungary demanded action by Serbia to those responsible for the assassination. 5 When Serbia failed to take any actions, Austria-Hungary decided to attack Serbia for revenge on July 28 1914.6 Russia, who was allied to Serbia, sent a vast army for defence against Austria-Hungary. 7 Germany, who was allied to Austria-Hungary, viewed the Russian mobilisation as an act of war against Austria-Hungary, so Germany declared war with Russia on August 1 1914.8 Then one thing led to another when France, who was allied to Russia found itself at war against Germany and Britain joined after being allied to France. ...read more.

Middle

100 000, the Germans felt that there protection was at stake against other countries.42 The loss of territory caused German speaking people to separate. Germans were forced to live in other countries.43 The Treaty caused Germany to go through a great depression.44 A lot of Germans were dissatisfied that their government did very little to help and voted Adolf Hitler in power.45 Hitler became Chancellor of Germany in January 1933. He started violating the Treaty of Versailles immediately. In 1926, Germany joined the League of Nations and accepted its western borders as a final and agreed not to try and change its eastern borders by force.46 Hitler was determined to destroy the League of Nations. 47Hitler secretly began rebuilding Germany's army and weapons. In 1934, he increased the size of the army to half a million, began building war ships and created an air force. 48 Although Britain, France and Italy knew about Hitler's intentions but they didn't do anything about it.49 In 1936, German troops were ordered by Hitler to enter the Rhineland. The army wasn't very strong at that time and could have been defeated. They were given orders to retreat if France or Britain started to fight but neither France nor Britain was prepared to start another war.50 During this year, Germany also made two important alliances with Italy and Japan.51 Hitler then began taking back the lands that had been taken away from Germany. German troops invaded Austria in March 1938 demanding a union with Germany. A vote asking the Austrian people whether they wanted to be part of Germany or not was taken place.52 This resulted in a 99% of votes wanted a union with Germany. ...read more.

Conclusion

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