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What military impacts did Canada play in World War II?

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Introduction

What military impacts did Canada play in World War II? IB Internal Assessment D-Day, Juno Beach. North Nova Scotia Highlanders going ashore from L.C.I.(L.) 118. A. Plan of Investigation Usually ignored on the world's map as a major powerhouse, Canada actually played a very important goal in the military progress of World War II, such as the Allied invasion of Italy and the Battle of Normandy. 1.1 million Canadians served in the armed forces during this war, and thousands more serve in the navy, with the casualty reading 45,000 dead and 55,000 wounded. By the end of the war, Canada has temporarily become a noteworthy military power; however, it is still being disregarded by the Big Three. The investigation attempts to correct this incorrect assumption and explore Canada's vast contribution to World War II as well as its significance, using both primary and secondary sources, such as Defining Canada: History, Identity, and Culture, a textbook by Nick Brune and associates, or Morton Desmond's A Military History of Canada. B. Summary of Evidence Prior to war, Canada expected that its primary contribution would be the production of war supplies rather than the mobilizations of armed forces. ...read more.

Middle

Composed by Nick Brune and various other scholars and historians from different school of thoughts, most of whom originated from Canadian universities and schools, it is widely recognized by researchers. Written in 2002 and published by the McGraw-Hill Company, it is used as a textbook in a high school history lessons curriculum. Defining Canada offers readers with a detailed account of the entire course of history of Canada, with thorough and comprehensive descriptions and judicious but neutral analysis of events. The book consists of influences from hundreds of primary sources, which presents readers with insightful examinations. For the purpose of this Internal Assessment, the book provides a full list of war episodes along with inclusive numbers of soldiers involved. Since it was written as a textbook, the information gathered is mostly informative and without bias or partiality. A Brief History of Canada is another overall volume in which the entire history of Canada is evaluated, with the selections on the World War II period being focused more on economic impacts and how trading and industrial control the opinions of the people. Unlike Defining Canada, which presented almost all factual information, Roger Riendeau incorporates astute investigations and somewhat judgments within his work. ...read more.

Conclusion

On the home front, as a result of Canada's involvement in the war, national unity between French and English was damaged, but nonetheless, national pride and confidence were enhanced. Also, typical to any war economies, Canada sprung out of the depression, strengthening and diversifying the manufacturing capacity. E. Conclusion When listing important theatres of World War II, from the Battle of the Atlantic, the invasions of Sicily and Normandy, to the successive liberation of Holland, Canadian forces had fought and contributed substantially to these events. Also, The Commonwealth Air Training Plan provided a significant number of significant pilots. Additionally, domestic production of war material, raw materials, and products had been vital to the Commonwealth's war effort. Furthermore, Canada came out triumphant as well, emerging from the war ready to represent a key character on the world stage. At the end of the war, she possessed the 4th largest navy in the world, on behalf of an unbalanced involvement in the Battle of the Atlantic. The war bolstered Canadians' jingoistic patriotism and ensured more intimate political, economic, and military connections between Canada and the United States. Canadians would eventually learn more about their nation's efforts on the scientific front; however, in 1945, most Canadians responded with pride when questioned about their nation's war effort. F. ...read more.

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