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WHy did Russian Install missiles in Cuba

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Introduction

Soviet Calculations in the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis: Why did the Soviets Install Missiles in Cuba Prior to the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis? Christina Sigalas Ms. Whitfield April 14th, 2011 Candidate Number: 001067-058 Word Count: 2000 Table of Contents Table of Contents.......................................................................................2 A. Plan of the Investigation...........................................................................3 B. Summary of Evidence............................................................................3-6 C. Evaluation of the Sources........................................................................6-7 D. Analysis.............................................................................................7-9 E. Conclusion..........................................................................................9 F. List of Sources......................................................................................10 A. Plan of the Investigation Over the years, several hypotheses have surfaced with the intent of explaining Soviet policy in the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis. This investigation aims to explain why the Soviet Union installed missiles in Cuba prior to the Cuban Missile Crisis. It will focus on the bases for the installment of these missiles in Cuba which are limited to an explanation of how the gains justified the risks and costs and the motives behind the emplacement of Soviet missiles in Cuba. The Soviet motives discussed are the desire to increase bargaining strength regarding Soviet issues, to defend Cuba and protect Castro`s regime, and to equalize the balance of military power by eliminating the apparent disparity in arms between the U.S. and the Soviets. This investigation does not assess anything beyond the basis the emplacement of Soviet missiles in Cuba. The two sources selected for evaluation, The Cuban Missile Crisis: Evolving Historical Perspectives by William J. Medland and The Cuban Missile Crisis: Reading the Lessons Correctly by Richard Ned Lebow are evaluated for their origins, purposes, values, and limitations. (Word Count: 176) ...read more.

Middle

The purpose of the document is to correct the hypotheses of theoreticians about the Crisis decision making and examine the validity of their hypothesis regarding Soviet Policy in the Cuban Missile Crisis. The document's value is that it evaluates a variety of hypotheses formed by various theoreticians, and is therefore not limited strictly to personal opinion and considers varied viewpoints. The article is limited in that it is geared towards a certain aim as it seeks to correct other theoreticians whom the author deems have misinterpreted the Soviet Policy in the Cuban Missile Crisis, hence the document's title "Reading the Lessons Correctly". The author does not side with the analysts but seems rather to condemn them in that they "deny irrationality in decision making and that their interpretations tell them as much about themselves as they do about the historical figures involved". In addition, the document is limited also because it does not offer as much historical information, devoting a mere three pages to it as it does for the analytical component. While The Cuban Missile Crisis: Reading the Lessons Correctly provides solely views of scholars with regards to the instalment of missiles in Cuba, The Cuban Missile Crisis: Evolving Historical Perspectives an article by William Medland published in The History Teacher is designed to "present a synthesis of the views of the participants and a synthesis of the counterviews of some scholars." The article is valuable in that it provides not only a scholarly perspective on the aforementioned issue but also the views of the figures directly involved in the issue, thereby allowing the reader to ...read more.

Conclusion

U.S. missiles had the upper hand as they had as they maintained a "first-strike" capability giving them the ability to strike anywhere in Russia. (Lebow 453). The U.S was further strengthened militarily as a result of an agreement they had made with Turkey permitting the establishment of a missile base. (Medland 436). Consequently, these circumstances gave Khrushchev the feeling of being entrapped by American military threat. In order to level the perceived disparity in arms, Soviet missiles were emplaced in Cuba within ninety miles of the U.S. border thereby also equipping them with a first-strike capability. (Word Count: 546) E. Conclusion It is evident that the reasons why the Soviets emplaced missiles in Cuba were founded on rational decision making that was perceived to coincide with the interests of the Soviet nation and their political interests. The Soviets were firm in their belief that though the emplacement of missiles in Cuba would possibly ignite a confrontation with the U.S., the gains far outweighed and justified the risks. The missiles could be used as bargaining tool for which synchronously the German problem, the China problem and the Soviet military inferiority could be solved in exchange for the removal of the missiles. In addition, the missiles would serve as a means of protecting Cuba from a highly anticipated U.S. aggression while simultaneously defending the Castro regime and resolving the apparent disparity in the power and numbers of the arms of the Soviet and the U.S. thereby relieving them of American military threat. Though there exist conflicting ideas about the basis for Soviet emplacement of missiles in Cuba, these theories offer the best speculations and answers to why the Soviets installed missiles in Cuba. (Word Count: 180) F. ...read more.

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