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Why The British Lost The Revolutionary War

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Introduction

The American Revolution refers to the period in history in which the Thirteen Colonies that became the United States of America gained independence from the British Empire. There were many battles and tactics against the British that were needed in order to obtain independence from them, including: The battle of Lexington, Bunker Hill, Saratoga, etc. Ultimately, the Americans succeeded in gaining Independence and winning the war. However, victory seemed out of reach for the Americans during the war; the Americans had fewer soldiers and weapons while the British had the most formidable army in the world at the time and flourished in soldiers and weaponry. There are significant reasons why the British lost the war despite having the upper hand in terms of weaponry and soldiers. Some of these include: the British fighting on American land, General Howe's lack of judgment, and the surrender of Lord Cornwallis and his soldiers. ...read more.

Middle

However, Howe misjudged; instead of following through with the plan, Howe decided to attack Philadelphia in order to discourage the Patriots, gain favor of Loyalists, and end the war. While Howe was in Philadelphia, Burgoyne and his soldiers started out fighting well, they had seized Fort Ticonderoga. However, things would take a drastic turn. In another battle (in Vermont, August 16, 1777) Burgoyne's army was severely decimated by American forces at Bennington. They were short of materials and with all help cut off, the British were forced to retreat to Saratoga. At Saratoga, General Horatio Gates surrounded Burgoyne and made him surrender on October 17, 1777. This was a major turning point and the war and really paved the way for America. Britain may not have had to retreat to Saratoga if William Howe had not abandoned his plan. Partially due to his misjudgment, America began it's road to victory, and Britain to it's demise. ...read more.

Conclusion

Washington and Rochambeau marched an army from New York to Virginia to join with other French forces while de Grasse sailed with soldiers to the Chesapeake Bay and the York River. Because of the precision of the positioning, they were able to capture Cornwallis and his troops. On October 17, 1781, after some resistance, Cornwallis surrendered he and his army of 7,000 men. Though this didn't win the Americans the war immediately, it put them way ahead of the British. This incident brought forth outcries in England against continuing the war; about two years later, after hardly any significant battles, the Americans and the British signed a final treaty on September 3, 1783. This sealed the defeat of the British. The fact that the war was fought on American soil, William Howe's misjudgments, and the surrender of John Cornwallis, all made Britain lose the war. This is despite their supremacy in both weaponry and soldiers. In the end, America was more determined and the British did not put their supremacy to use, hence William Howe's failure to attack. These are the reasons the British lost the war. ...read more.

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