• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Comparison of Robert Frost's Tree at my Window and The Sound of the Trees

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Robert Frost Comparative Essay IB English HL Year 1 Code name: thdtmdgus Comparison of "Tree at my Window" and "The Sound of the Trees" Robert Frost's "Tree at my Window" and "The Sound of the Trees" both share common grounds with regard to their structure, sound devices, tone, and imagery-not to mention the central leitmotif which is the tree. Frost's "Tree at my Window" begins as follows: "Tree at my window, window tree" (line 1). What immediately catches our attention is the mirror-structure in which the first line is presented. This deliberate syntactical symmetry carries the implicit notion that the tree may be more than a provision from Mother Nature but an object of profound self-reflection. These first few lines of Frost's "The Sound of the Trees" reinforce a sense of delicacy. The sense of delicacy is derived primarily from Frost's repetitive use of words that contain relatively long and complaisant vowel sounds. "Tree" and "window", for instance, reinforce this sense of tenderness that is closely associated with nature-as trees are a part of nature. In fact, "The Sound of the Trees" has a similar beginning with regard to Frost's use of sound devices. ...read more.

Middle

As can be seen in both poems, Frost has a penchant for nature, and namely the kinds of revelations into human thoughts derived from his observation of nature. In "The Sound of the Trees," we are introduced to an emotionally debilitated narrator who is inclined to make "the reckless choice" as he sees the "trees sway, from the window or the door (lines 17-18)." The reckless choice is most probably suicide, taking into consideration the overall context of the poem. What starts off as the narrator's complaint about the "noise of these" trees soon develops into a more serious and depressing contemplation. With the final line, "But I shall be gone," the narrator forebodes his death. "The Sound of the Trees" is not a tale of perpetual gloom and despair; for instance, as is clear from lines 15-16, "My feet tug at the floor/And my head sways to my shoulder," there are lyrical representations of a trees' movements. And Frost's close attention to the trees' swaying movements is yet another commonality between the two tree poems. In "The Sound of the Trees," these tree movements reflect clearly a need for contentment, which has to be pursued by a change, but the roots which "tug at the floor" perhaps are illustrating the limitations of that end. ...read more.

Conclusion

that is apparent in each stanza is a structural representation of the human spirit that desires freedom. With regard to "Tree at my Window," the most interesting lines are the last four. Whereas the tree is most concerned with the stormy or capricious weather conditions, Frost is most concerned with the weather, or thoughts, in his head. The tension between the nature and man comes to an end when, as Frost writes, "she put our heads together. It's not perfectly clear to what or to whom "she" is referring; however, clearly, this line is a reflection of Frost's ambiguous feelings. Frost sees in nature, namely in the tree, man's relation to the world. He realizes, basically, our place in the universe, and what it truly means to be a human. In fact, the remoteness of nature-and how it's partially covered by the lowered "sash"-reveals the tragedy of the narrator's solitude, and his relative insignificance in the face of vast forces, such as the diffuse cloud." To Frost, nature is obviously appealing, but it's also partially dangerous. It is the mirror of the human world that reflects our blemishes as manifestly our world's beauty. In conclusion, the most fundamental common ground between the two Robert Frost poems seems to be Frost's ambivalence towards nature, and in this case, trees. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our International Baccalaureate Languages section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related International Baccalaureate Languages essays

  1. Letter of complaint

    They eat in soup-kitchen and save every cent to buy books. I am convicted that it is unfair that someone says that being a student is not stressful. Proffesors treat their pupils like they would already know everything, and they testing their knowledge every day.

  2. A Comparison between An African Sermon and Roman Fever-

    The setting is important for the rising action of the story. Wharton also uses her short story, "Roman Fever" to comment on the society she lives in. The message or theme that the author is trying to get through is that you never know people as well as you think you do.

  1. Hersenschimmen/Gewiste Sporen comparison

    Hij ligt alleen maar in zijn bed en poept daar zelfs in. In gewiste sporen zijn heel weinig aanwijzingen van verwaarlozing van de persoonlijke hygi´┐Żne. Zo zit ze een beetje onder de modder na een flashback en vind ze dat haar man overdrijft over dat er geen schone sokken zijn.

  2. History research - Early Australian bushrangers. English writing -my region and favourite authors.

    John Romeril's One Night the Moon, tells the story of an Aboriginal tracker who searches for a lost child despite being told by the child's father that his help is not wanted because he is Aboriginal. It is based on the true story of tracker Alexander Riley, who served in the New South Wales Police Force from 1911 to 1950.

  1. Free essay

    Gregor And Meursalt (Comparison)

    the two characters were making difference in other people's minds about themselves. Meursault was living a human body so people around him were less suspicious on him to be a real outsider to the people, but Gregor as having changed to have a beetle's body was making people have no

  2. In what ways and to what effect, does Milton use comparison in Paradise Lost ...

    It is also the battlefield that Beelzebub suggests they try to corrupt because he knows that although there is goodness on earth, it is not at par with that of Heaven's, and is thus able to be defeated. It is portrayed as the neutral middle-ground by Beelzebub who states that

  1. Markheim- Robert Louis Stevenson

    There are further religious references when Stevenson states that Markheim was "startled to the soul," another word closely associated with redemption and 'good'. Though Markheim appears unremorseful, such figurative language creates ambiguity and discerns the reader, further bluring the line between reality and appearance.

  2. Is Sam Marsdyke a Construct of The Communitys Attitude towards Him and Other Factors?

    which the book is set is a microcosm of our society all together. Indeed, in the book comments like "You forced her against her will"ii are common in the book. Because of this, Marsdyke was thrown out of school and forced to tend to the sheep under his father's eye.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work