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Great Gatsby Ending Analysis

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Introduction

The Great Gatsby Final Paragraph's Analysis This final section of the novel uses an ambivalent tone, recurring images and fractured syntax to draw together the essential thematic concerns of the novel. Through the use of these methods, F. Scott Fitzgerald undermines something of higher significance; that the American Dream is a false and unachievable one, as dreams are naturally unattainable. The tone of this last section is ambivalent. It is ambivalent in a way that "[Gatsby] had come a long way, and his dream must have seemed so close that [Gatsby] could hardly fail to grab it." Gatsby's dream is to be with Daisy, his childhood girlfriend. Although she didn't wait for him, Gatsby still continued to pursue his dreams, "believing in the green light and the orgastic future," refusing to accept the truth and hoping that everything will come together. He earned enough money to get himself the best of everything - the fanciest car, the largest house and the finest cloths, all of which were symbols of how he has "made it". ...read more.

Middle

The "fresh, green breast" is also a reference back to when Myrtle Wilson gets run over by what can be argued to be a light green car. Ironically, the cause of her death was a fatal injury to her breast. These images are important as cars symbolize the American Dream - wealth, power and ultimately, greed and corruption, and for Myrtle Wilson to get her breast, a sign of fertility and potential for growth, ripped off and left "swinging loose like a flap" indicates that the American Dream can be achieved, but only through brutal and illegal means. This ultimately leads back to Gatsby, who would do anything, even earn money illegally, to achieve his dream, which portrays the American Dream to be a false dream, pushed forward by the corruption and false values of the society. The recurring colors and images in the final section enabled the reader to recognize phrases or words that undermined a greater significance in the novel. ...read more.

Conclusion

Though we row our boats towards the future in an attempt to catch our eluded dreams, we will never get there, because the current flows toward the past. This undermines that the American Dream is in fact unattainable, because it is just a materialistic illusion that is only attained temporarily through reaching back into the past; yet, it can be easily shattered as it can't be sustained forever, as Daisy eventually chooses Tom over Gatsby. In conclusion, the American Dream is possible; however, the destructiveness that goes with it can easily cause that false, materialistic illusion to dismantle and shatter. Through the novel, F. Scott Fitzgerald uses a portrayal of Jay Gatsby to undermine the importance that dreams are naturally unattainable. Though Gatsby still believed that it was achievable, the fact that he used crooked means to achieve his dream leads to the double portrayal of the ironic title "The Great Gatsby" where he is not that "Great" after all, and the American Dream as a distortion of the truth which is full of decaying moral and social values. ...read more.

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