• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Othello Essay

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Credulity, Jealousy and Passion: Causes of Tragedy in Shakespeare's Othello In the tragic play, Othello, by William Shakespeare, the protagonist Othello transforms from a powerful noble gentleman to a savage murderer. There are many factors that cause this tragedy. This includes credulity, jealousy and passion. Credulity makes Othello believe Iago's lies and becomes jealous, passion makes Othello kill his innocent wife, Desdemona, without knowing the truth. Credulity is the reason that makes Othello becomes jealous, therefore causing a series of problems, leading to the final tragedy. Iago makes a plan that makes Othello jealous and angry. So he uses some coincidences and provides the information that Desdemona cuckolds Othello with Cassio: "That he would steal away so guilty-like, seeing your coming." (3.3.39) Now, Iago starts to make a suspicion of Cassio and Desdemona, and Othello starts to believe Iago and gets mad. Othello is such a credulous man that he believes what Iago tells him, also thinks Iago is an honest man. This is what Iago plans, that Othello believes him but suspect Cassio and Desdemona, therefore becomes jealous. ...read more.

Middle

(4.1.46) Jealousy is one of the main themes in this play, and also one of the causes that makes Othello descend from nobility to savagery. As well, in this play, not only is Othello jealous but also other people, for example, Iago. Iago is jealous that Othello promotes Cassio to be a lieutenant but not him, so he starts to hate both Othello and Cassio. He plans to make Othello angry, and jealous. Therefore, the outcome that Othello descends from nobility to savagery is what Iago plans: "I'll pour this pestilence into his ear."(2.3.356) Iago lies to Othello that his wife Desdemona cuckolds him with Cassio and uses many opportunities as he can to prove his lies. Othello believes him and allows the "green-eyed monster."(3.3.166) of jealousy to control him. Othello is jealous of Cassio; he hates Desdemona and he promises he will "tear her all to pieces"(3.3.428), and "chop her into messes"(4.1.202), when he believes that she is unfaithful to him. Further more, what is ironic, Iago tells Othello not to be crazy and jealous, so that Othello believes him more and increases ...read more.

Conclusion

In another hand, instead of comforting Cassio or Desdemona, Othello decides that he is going to kill Desdemona. Also, when Desdemona losses her handkerchief, Iago gets it and gives it to Cassio; Othello does not use his intelligence as usual, to find out why and how does Cassio gets the handkerchief. He believes Cassio has it because Desdemona loves him and gives it to him. Here shows Othello's passion, he does not figure out what happens under the surface, but just believes in what he sees at the end. Even more, passion makes he does not believe Desdemona's explanation. The handkerchief expands his suspicion, Othello turns out to be more passionate, and finally he cannot stands anymore, therefore he kills Desdemona. In conclusion, the influences that causes Othello descend from nobility to savagery are credulity, jealousy and passion; which credulity causes jealousy, and jealousy leads to passion. Therefore causes the final tragedy happens. Word Count: 868 Reference: Shakespeare, William. Othello. United States of America: Penguin Group, 1998. I pledge that this assignment has been written in accordance with the Ashbury College English Department Policy on Academic Honesty. ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our International Baccalaureate Languages section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related International Baccalaureate Languages essays

  1. How is Iago presented in Act 1 of William Shakepeare's play Othello

    He also calls his master "the devil" and "a Barbary horse". Although Iago is hateful, he is also extremely clever and we can see this from what he says and does. For example, when shouting to Brabantio in scene 1, Iago hides himself in the shadows so that Brabantio doesn't

  2. Male and Female Relationships in Othello

    This further highlights his view of Desdemona as a capable and intelligent being, in their gender equal relationship as well as exciting the audience with the anticipation of what Desdemona might do. The relationship between Iago and Emilia's stands in complete contrast with Othello and Desdemona's.

  1. IB ENGLISH ANTIGONE ESSAY

    Over the years, he came to realize that there comes a time when one must accept responsibility despite the desire to return to youthful innocence. He has a greater sense of responsibility than he was ever able to instill in Antigone.

  2. A commentary on Act 1 Scene 3 Othello

    to cause chaos among the other characters while they assume him to be a righteous man, especially Othello who repeats himself and address Iago as "honest" Iago several times. The syntax used in this extract plays an important part in revealing Iago's wickedness.

  1. Obesity - Arabic Assignment

    do not recommend they take up the surgical treatments and should always leave it as a last resort. However, if the person is morbidly obese and cannot move, then surgical treatment is recommended as it can save their life. My opinion is based on the fact that if a person

  2. IB English - To Kill a Mockingbird (journal responses)

    So in agreement with my partner, her suffering was probably worsening and sometimes it's the right time to let people go. That does not mean people should not grieve, but should just be more accepting of loss. Response #3: Chapters 12 to 17 This section began with Calpurnia taking Jem and Scout to her church.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work