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To Autumn Analysis

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Introduction

John Keats (1795-1821) was one of the principal poets of the English Romantic movement and is known for his elaborate word choice and sensual imagery. The Romantic Movement emphasized the creative expression of the individual and the need to find and formulate new forms of expression. Hence, Keats wrote a great number of odes, which allowed a tremendous expression of emotion, and his were perhaps the greatest odes of the 19th century. Keats did not employ a rigid rhyme scheme in his odes so as to more freely express his emotions, as was the emphasis of the Romantic Movement. The structure of the poem is well thought out and unique to this ode. We can say that each stanza is an "almost sonnet" as each line follows a strict iambic pentameter however varying in rhyme scheme. The first 4 lines all follow the pattern "ABAB" creating a foundation for the stanza, but it follows a different path towards the end. This deviation is due to the unpredictability of nature as seasons change over time. This gives us the feeling that seasons are cyclical. The first stanza is built upon the seasons of spring and summer as the diction is lively and youthful. The second stanza of autumn is more content. Finally, the last stanza is sombre foreshadowing death and pain. This structure is also similar to the life of Keats at the time when he wrote this poem. ...read more.

Middle

(lines 21-22) This idea suggests that autumn is quietening down, getting ready for winter and the last harvests are coming through. Also the word "oozing" implies a certain sluggish nature where things are tiring and withering. Keats uses a great deal of imagery throughout the poem prompting the reader to envisage autumn and how they feel about it. One of the beginning images of the poem is of the 'maturing sun'. This creates the idea that autumn is when the sun is growing old after the summer and it is getting lower in the sky and growing golden. It is a sight that is a characteristic of the beginning of autumn and creates a good start to the poem and the feeling of the fruitfulness to come. Also in the first stanza, Keats depicts vines running around the roof: 'vines that round the thatch-eaves run...' (line 4) This effectively depicts autumn being busy preparing the last-minute fruit and plumping the vegetables. This is a beautiful way to imagine autumn and is a characteristic of late autumn in our minds. It is also a symbol for the youth of autumn. One of the final images of the poem is of the 'small gnats mourn' (line 27). This creates an image of the gnats, swiftly flying around, buzzing sadly. In late autumn you often find gnats and as Keats depicts them as mourning, it gives a feeling that autumn is over and winter is arriving. ...read more.

Conclusion

In 'To Autumn', Keats intentionally used sound effects such as alliteration and onomatopoeia which really help to create a sense of autumn. An example of alliteration in the third stanza is 'dying day'. These words are melancholy and give the idea that the pretty month of autumn is drawing to a close. The alliteration helps create a sense of autumn by creating a catchy sound so the reader remembers it. An example of onomatopoeia is 'oozings'. This helps the reader visualise the cider creeping out of the press by making the sound it makes or the sound we imagine it to make. It also has a long vowel sound so the reader visualises the cider coming out slowly and smoothly. Finally Keats' says 'hours by hours'. This example contains onomatopoeia, so the words seem to take a long time, long vowels, for the same reason, and also soft consonants. The soft consonants cause the reader to think very calmly, sleepily and carefree, so you think of autumn as Keats does. ?? ?? ?? ?? This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ ...read more.

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