• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11
  12. 12
    12
  13. 13
    13
  14. 14
    14
  15. 15
    15
  16. 16
    16
  17. 17
    17

Infinite Summation - IB Math SL Mathematics Portfolio 2011

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Mathematics SL Portfolio Type II

2012

002329/

Anglo-Chinese School (Independent)

Infinite Summation

“I undersigned, hereby declare that the following course work is all my own work and that I worked independently on it”

__________________

Name:                                ____________________________

Class:                                ____________________________

Index Number:                ____________________________

Subject Teacher:                ____________________________

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Introduction

Part I

Irrational number: When x=1 and a=2

Negative number: When x=1 and a=-3

0 and 1:

Non-integer: When x=1 and a=0.87

Proving the general statement

Part II

T9 (2,x)

T9 (3,x)

Validating the General Statement

a= 6

When a=2/3

Scope

Limitations

For when a is a negative number:

For when a is equal to 0:

For when a is equal to 1:

Conclusion

Introduction

A summation is the operation of adding a sequence of numbers, with the result being their sum total[1]. An infinite series is essentially a series with an infinite number of terms. Due to the indeterminable nature of all the terms, mathematical analysis is required to fully understand the series and its properties. However, that is not to say that infinite series are not used often. In fact, they are regularly used in the fields of physics and computer science. [2]In this portfolio, we will be investigating the sum of infinite sequences tnwhere

t0=1, t1=(xlna)1, t2=(xlna)22!, t3=(xlna)33!,…,tn=(xlna)nn!

By observing various trends within the series, I will come up with some general statements and will test the validity of said statements with the aid of some examples. Then, I will try to link the patterns discovered to some pre-established mathematical concepts, such as the Maclaurin series.


...read more.

Middle

1

#NUM!

#NUM!

2

#NUM!

#NUM!

n

tn

sn

0

#NUM!

#NUM!

1

0.000000

#NUM!

2

0.000000

#NUM!

As we can see, the above tables prove that the sequence is only applicable to numbers for which the value of [xln(1)]n is defined.


Non-integer: When x=1 and a=0.87

n

tn

sn

0

1.000000

1.000000

1

-0.139262

0.860738

2

0.009697

0.870435

3

-0.000450

0.869985

4

0.000016

0.870000

5

0.000000

0.870000

6

0.000000

0.870000

7

0.000000

0.870000

8

0.000000

0.870000

9

0.000000

0.870000

10

0.000000

0.870000

Once again, we see that even for non-integers, while the value of Sn does fluctuate a little, it does eventually reach 0.87 as n tends towards ∞.

From the above examples, we can conclude that a general statement can be made regarding the series, i.e. when x=1, Sn →a as n→∞.


Proving the general statement

Now let us try to prove the general statement for the series for when x=1, using something more concrete than mere observation. To do this, let us make use of the Maclaurin series[3], explained in detail in the scope section of the portfolio. We will be using the exponential form of the series:

ey=1+y1+y22!+y33!+…+y22!+…

Substituting the values with those of the sequence above:

exlna=1+xlna1+(xlna)22!+(xlna)33!+…+(xlna)nn!+…

When x=1:

elna=1+lna1+(lna)22!+(lna)33!+…+(lna)nn!+…

Let elna=p

ln both sides:

lnalne=lnp

∴lna=lnp

∴p=elna

=a

Part II

To arrive at the above general statement, we varied the value of a. Now, let us try varying the value of x to see if we can arrive at a similar general statement. Let us take Tn  (a,x) as the sun of the first n terms for different values of a and  x. Now, let us consider the case where a=2.

T9  (2,x)

x

T9(2,x)

1

2

2

3.99994

3

7.997485

4

15.96351

5

31.70213

6

62.30535

7

120.4657

8

227.9637

9

420.6994

10

755.6926

From the above values of the above table, we can see for each value of x, the value of T9  (2,x) approaches the value of ax. For example, when x=5, T9  (2,x) tends towards 32, that is 25. However, starting from when x=6, the value of T9  (2,x) begins to deviate significantly from the value of ax.


T9  (3,x)

Now let us look at T9  (3,x)

T9  (3,x)

x

T9(3,x)

1

2.999993

2

8.995812

3

26.81482

4

78.11916

5

217.4715

6

569.0338

7

1390.257

8

3174.043

9

6802.981

10

13771.39

...read more.

Conclusion

For when a is a negative number:

tn=(xlna)nn!

t0=(xln(-1))00!

Let x=1

xln-1=ln-11

            =0

∴t0=000!

The above value is undefined, thus the series does not work for negative numbers.

For when a is equal to 0:

tn=(xlna)nn!

t0=(xln0)00!

Again,

t0=000!

Which is undefined, thus the series does not work for when a is equal to 0 either.

For when a is equal to 1:

tn=(xlna)nn!

t0=(xln1)00!

Again,

t0=000!

Thus, we can prove that the series expansion does not work for when a=0, a=1 or

a<0.


Conclusion

The Mathematics SL Type 1 Portfolio has helped me in many ways. As someone who is not all that great at mathematics, it has helped me tremendously to learn how much the use of technology can aid in the study of mathematics. I also learnt a great deal about infinite summation, the Taylor and Maclaurin series as well as about how they help us even in or daily life. Also, the portfolio has helped me analyze and rethink many of my approaches to mathematics thus far. Thus, from this portfolio I have not only learnt about infinite summation, but a great deal about myself and the influence mathematics has on the world around me as well.

Page


[1]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Summation

[2]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Series_(mathematics)

[3]http://www.intmath.com/series-expansion/2-maclaurin-series.php

[4]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taylor_series

[5]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taylor_series

[6]http://mathworld.wolfram.com/MaclaurinSeries.html

[7]http://www.intmath.com/series-expansion/2-maclaurin-series.php

...read more.

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our International Baccalaureate Maths section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related International Baccalaureate Maths essays

  1. Math IB HL math portfolio type II. Deduce the formula Sn = ...

    [a1 + (n + 1)d + a1 + (n + 2)d] 2 (an + an+1) = (an-2 + an-1) + (an+2 + an+3) Therefore: 2 (an + an+1) = (an-2 + an-1) + (an+2 + an+3) III. 2 (a5 + a6 + a7)

  2. Extended Essay- Math

    ������;(Y"@�(c)!r0...��+��-~E�!@� ^�䨬(r)(r).'Ol�gΜl"a� GD��:�8U�S�&�' �]p)gq�X��~�ҥKaY��Ic���;�3Ôª``�9�)]�1/4�R�Ȳ����,K "�fF��"�jU�5q�(tm)-�JF� (�Yx���1/4"q���q��r3�ocD@� �'P E�E�dE��=;��a���d����a���h��Ö+'�~�"�=��o_V�C1/4�u��]_��-!8��(r)�wÚ]u�v""`G�"�`��"���@�*���n��/��IzD�'�rT�zV g1 ?'i��%kÆ�-/�Z�� �Å�eF�*83.1/4j7p��� b�W�^����ËD8��8 P�!GrQ���� "���(tm)"�y�8jxw$�H�OI�|H80GN�����&��(r)��r�q��۪�1 '�T����$�@�gq�=y��Å�+�C�� �jUpEYk�<0 Ôkll"�VUSn���SO�4R4-��v**A1/2�U� Pv�/�X� C0R�� ��.8�*{�4R1-�c�ZnjU� ' �� -7n�"��H�l�2ESp� 2rP �d���jr!!4c��ɿ��� ���DF��U�t '������W^�%MpÆ�3/4HÙlHܳd�'���b,T��P&Jz� -.A�_~��R���/((tm)q� 7�Y{r��o##PYnC:r��� ��D�h���WG:��&M�T__Ïr� ��tJS / '�#C��SÞ�L(tm)�4EsqX;�.� 9'�Bx��...&���c-�U�v�5�����A8"�t���1��Pm�g�"����֭���x�#�*8��(tm)�#��8M d��(tm)�|�PJ� Âж#�K� Æ��=E ���G`������NCs*O(����~}���(tm)x�Z "�,D��� lÚ´I(c)

  1. Math IB SL BMI Portfolio

    to the same domain and range as the domain and range on the scatterplot, the graph of both the data and the function together is as follows: Comparing the two graphs, one can see that where BMI = 18.4 in the function is around 0.400 years off from the corresponding point on the scatterplot where BMI = 18.4.

  2. SL Type 1 PF - Infinite Summation - A general statement has been reached, ...

    Table 4 shows the data calculated via the same method used previously. 3 4 5 1 2.999999 3.999991 4.999962 2 8.999101 15.990192 24.954056 3 26.941276 63.331066 121.747436 4 79.803290 241.624473 551.663426 5 230.019331 857.473473 2221.100395 6 633.777653 2770.933209 7836.811421 7 1649.507247 8117.577207 22402.123516 Table 4: Values of for different values

  1. IB SL Math Portfolio- Logarithm Bases

    This expression can be rewritten now, as logabx= cd/(c+d) Thus, the general statement for logabx in terms of c and d is logabx= cd/(c+d). Test the validity of your general statement using other values of a, b, and x.

  2. Solution for finding the sum of an infinite sequence

    It won't go further than 4. I will use a graph and this is explain more - Now, I am going to predict that when and in the equation , the . So according to my guess, I was totally right. This proves that the general term is .

  1. Maths SL Portfolio - Parallels and Parallelograms

    A4 ? A5 ? A6, - A3 ? A4 ? A5 ? A6 ? A7, - A4 ? A5 ? A6 ? A7 ? A8, - A5 ? A6 ? A7 ? A8 ? A9 = 5 - A1 ? A2 ? A3 ? A4 ? A5 ? A6, - A2 ? A3 ? A4 ? A5 ?

  2. Shadow Functions Maths IB HL Portfolio

    The points of intersection can be calculated by equating both functions: When The fact that the two curves have three points of intersection makes it difficult to figure out the shadow-generating function . The most reasonable assumption is that the relationship between , and is the same as in the case of the quadratics and cubics.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work