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AIM: To find the specific heat capacity of a solid by method of mixtures.

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Introduction

To Measure Specific Heat Capacity of a solid by method of mixtures

Date: - February 2, 2009

IB Topic: - Core 3.2.1

Assessment Criteria:-

Data Collection & ProcessingConclusion & Evaluation

ASPECT 1

MARKS AWARDED

RECORDING RAW DATA

PROCESSING RAW DATA

PRESENTING PROCESSED DATA

TOTAL

ASPECT 2

MARKS AWARDED

CONCLUSION

EVALUATING PROCEDURES

IMPROVING THE INVESTIGATION

TOTAL

AIM: To find the specific heat capacity of a solid by method of mixtures.

Materials Required: calorimeter, Thermometer (110 ˚ c), stopwatch,  

                                              weighing machine.

Background Theory:

  1. Specific heat capacity of a substance is the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of 1 Kg of that substance by 1˚ c.
  2. Thermal equilibrium is a state when the amount of heat given by one body to another is equal to the amount of heat
...read more.

Middle

Change in temperature of metal: 95 ± 0.5 - 25 ± 0.5 °C

                                  70 ± 1 °C

Heat Lost = Heat Gained

Mass of metal*SIC of metal*change in temperature of metal=(mass of water*SIC of water*change in temperature of water)+(mass of calorimeter*SIC of copper*change in temperature of calorimeter)

0.0246±0.0001 kg * C1 * 70±1 °C = (0.05±0.0001 kg * 4186 J kg-1 °C-1 * 3±1 °C)+(0.0425±0.0001 kg * 390 J kg-1 °C-1 * 3 ± 1 °C)

0.0246 ± 0.0001 * C1 * 70 ± 1 = (0.05 ± 0.0001 * 4186* 3 ± 1) + (0.0425 ± 0.0001 * 390 * 3 ± 1)

1.722 ± 0.057 * C1 = (627.9 ± 210.5) + (49.725 ± 16.69)

1.722 ± 0.057 * C1 = 677.625 ± 227.19

C1= image00.png

C1= 393.5104 ± 144.96 J kg-1 °C-1

Case 2:

Change in temperature of Calorimeter and Water: 26 ± 0.5 - 24 ± 0.5 °C

                                                    2 ± 1 °C

Change in temperature of metal: 95 ± 0.5 - 24 ± 0.5 °C

                                  71 ± 1 °C

Heat Lost = Heat Gained

Mass of metal*SIC of metal*change in temperature of metal=(mass of water*SIC of water*change in temperature of water)+(mass of calorimeter*SIC of copper*change in temperature of calorimeter)

0.0246±0.0001 kg * C2 * 71±1 °C = (0.08±0.

...read more.

Conclusion

± 1oo  J approx.

Possible errors:

  1. Systematic Error in the measurement of variables in instruments such as the thermometer and the weighing scale. The extent is represented by the uncertainty.
  1. Improper isolation may have led to the system trying to attain equilibrium with the atmosphere and thus reducing the overall final temperature of the system.
  1. A lot of heat could be lost during the transfer of the solid metal block to the calorimeter
  1. There could be parallax error while reading the thermometer.

Possible ways of reducing such errors:

  1. Usage of branded instruments to assure accuracy.
  2. Using digital thermometers to prevent parallax error and reducing the uncertainty.
  3. Making the transfer of the metal block quickly so that very less heat energy is escaped.

H1 :- Specific Heat Capacity Of Water

Candidate Name: - Anurag Saboo

Session No. :-

...read more.

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