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Electricity Safety

Extracts from this document...



  1. Introduce electricity.
  2. Why is electricity dangerous?
  1. Relationship between current and voltage.
  2. How a person completes a circuit.
  1. Why is electricity useful?
  2. How can you avoid accidents?
  3. How can you help someone who got a shock?
  4. How do we practice safety at home and school?

At home electricity runs the lights, television, toaster and more. Electricity is a form of energy. Energy is power, the power to do and move things, and to make things work. Electricity is made up of atoms. An atom centre includes at least one proton and neutron. At many a least one electron travels around the centre of the atom at a huge amount of speed. The movement of electrons produces electricity.

There are many ways of finding electricity or getting electrified. There are also many kinds of electric types, for example static electricity.

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The movement of electricity is very dangerous. If electricity travels through you, you could easily, seriously get hurt or even die. Electricity can travel through you, if you touch an electric circuit and the ground at the same time; you become electricity's easiest path.

You can avoid these kinds of accidents by keeping all electrical appliances away from water. This is because water is a great conductor of electricity. Another way to avoid is to make sure your hands are dry when you are about to anything electrical. An additional way to avoid electrical accidents is to not use water when putting out an electrical fire. However you should use a multipurpose fire extinguisher.

A current is the flow of electrons. A voltage calculates how much energy the light bulb takes up, by calculating the energy before it reaches the bulb and after.

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After you get that person no longer in contact with the current, check the persons breathing. If it’s rapid, irregular, or stopped, have someone else call emergency. If the person is fine look for burned skin, if he/she has no burned skin it could still be deep and painful in the inside.

You can practice safety at home by replacing frayed wires, when you are outside, especially after a storm, watch out for broken poles and downed wires, and make sure appliances are turned off when not in use. You can also practice safety at school by teachers teaching you. You could also practice safety at school by keeping a fair distance away from fire or electricity or even electric wires while doing an experiment and it is not turned off.





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