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Experiment to measure the speed of sound in a resonance tube

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

PS

Experiment to measure the speed of sound in a resonance tube

Frequency(Hz)

Resonating Length±0.05 (cm)

Average Resonating Length of the tube (cm)

Resonating Length uncertainty (cm)

Trial 1

Trial 2

Trial 3

256

32.5

33.5

33

33

0.2

288

28.5

29.5

30.5

29.5

1

320

26.5

27.5

25.5

26.5

1

384

20.9

22.1

23.3

22.1

1

426

20.3

19.5

19.9

19.9

0.4

480

18.2

17.7

17.2

17.7

1

512

16.5

17.5

15.5

16.5

1

The Resonating length uncertainty for

...read more.

Middle

Similarly the uncertainties for all the lengths are to be calculated individually.

Processed Data

Resonating Length (cm) ±0.5

Resonating Length (m)

Resonating Length uncertainty (m)

33

0.33

0.002

29.5

0.295

0.01

26.5

0.265

0.01

22.1

0.221

0.004

19.9

0.199

0.01

17.7

0.177

0.01

16.5

0.165

0.01

l= observed resonating length

L= corrected resonating length

Diameter of tube= 3.54 cm

Radius= 3.54/2 = 1.77cm

End-Correction= 0.

...read more.

Conclusion

Evaluation

  1. There is a ±0.1 error in the graph. After drawing the slope it can be seen that most points pass through or are pretty close to it.
  2. The data given is very much sufficient to address the practical question.
  3. Possible errors that may occur would be human errors because the sound heard may not be the loudest but still recorded or maybe writing down the incorrect frequency or length. There might be a systematic error such as a defected tuning fork or resonance tube.

Improving the Investigation

  1. Trying the experiment more than one time to reduce error.
  2. Work in a group to make sure everyone can hear the sound.

...read more.

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