• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11
  12. 12
    12
  13. 13
    13
  14. 14
    14
  15. 15
    15
  16. 16
    16
  17. 17
    17
  18. 18
    18
  19. 19
    19
  20. 20
    20
  21. 21
    21

Fluid Dynamics

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

                Migicovsky  

Introduction

As objects move through fluids, they are exposed to numerous forces that enhance or impede their progress.  By analyzing and understanding these forces, one can predict the velocity of a moving object.  Of the forces exerted on an object falling through a liquid, such as buoyant force or the force of gravity, the viscous or drag force appears to have the largest negative effect on the object.  

The effect of aero and hydrodynamic drag forces and friction appears underrepresented in high school physics courses.  Perhaps it is because concepts such as viscous and turbulent drag forces are difficult to predict and measure.  My preliminary research indicated there are many factors affecting the forces on an object.  These concepts fall in the field of fluid mechanics.

Initially, my study began with the idea of measuring the aerodynamic drag force exerted on a model rocket.  My primary interest was in the factors that influenced the maximum height reached by a rocket with a set amount of propellant.  I thought that launching a rocket on a particularly humid or hot day might result in a different maximum height than a launch on a colder day.  It might be possible to theoretically identify the factors such as the pressure or density of the air, then relate them to the measured height.  I soon realized that this experiment would not produce accurate data or a clear theoretical relationship because it involved a multitude of variables that were impossible to control without the use of a weather-controlling machine.  Progressing fromthis first idea, a more controllable experiment evolved: measuring and comparing the terminal velocities of a ball falling through glycerine at various temperatures.  Glycerine was selected because its high viscosity[1] exhibits demonstrable results.

...read more.

Middle

 (radius 0.317cm)

1.001

image19.png

7.50

Glycerine

208.45

166

1.26

        Base Temperature (17ºC) Vt Measurements

        Since the raw data are numerous, due to the number of tests performed and the precision of the time measurements, they are not presented in full here, but in Appendix B.

        For each test, distance travelled by the ball over time was quantified.  Then the data were analysed to determine terminal velocity.  Since the velocities were not completely regular, an average for each test was calculated.  As the acceleration decreased to near zero, the values of velocity would be counted towards the test’s average.  For the tests at 17ºC, terminal velocity seemed to be reached after 2 seconds. To aid in explanation, I offer this sample of data and calculation from test 2 (Table 2).  

Table 2 – Test 2, Distance and Time measurements

Time Code

Real Time

(s)

(±0.005s)

Measured d (cm) (±0.0005m)

Real d (m)

(±0.0005m

Velocity

(m/s)

Acceleration

(m/s2),

a

41;23

0

1.1

0

0

0

41;24

0.033367

1.15

0.0005

0.014985

0.224546

41;25

0.066733

1.2

0.001

0.014985

1.35E-05

41;26

0.1001

1.3

0.002

0.02997

0.336813

41;27

0.133467

1.4

0.003

0.02997

-2.4E-15

41;28

0.166834

1.5

0.004

0.02997

1.95E-15

41;29

0.2002

1.7

0.006

0.059941

0.673692

42;00

0.233567

1.9

0.008

0.059939

-5.4E-05

42;01

0.266934

2.25

0.0115

0.104894

1.058575

42;02

0.3003

2.6

0.015

0.104897

9.42E-05

42;03

0.333667

2.95

0.0185

0.104894

-9.4E-05

42;04

0.367034

3.3

0.022

0.104894

-1.2E-14

42;05

0.4004

3.7

0.026

0.119883

0.421132

42;06

0.433767

4

0.029

0.089909

-1.04803

42;07

0.467134

4.4

0.033

0.11988

0.78595

42;08

0.500501

4.7

0.036

0.08991

-1.0479

42;27

1.134468

10

0.089

0.083601

-0.01033

43;12

1.634968

14

0.129

0.07992

-0.00752

43;24

2.035369

17.2

0.161

0.07992

-2.7E-17

44;05

2.435769

20

0.189

0.06993

-0.02673

44;11

2.635969

21.5

0.204

0.074925

0.024118

44;22

3.003003

24.3

0.232

0.076287

0.003678

45;01

3.33667

26.5

0.254

0.065934

-0.03346

45;13

3.73707

29.6

0.285

0.077423

0.026564

45;17

3.903904

30.7

0.296

0.065934

-0.07486

Where:        Real time        = image20.pngas marked on video frame

        Measured d        = the actual measurement of distance from the ruler

        Actual d        = the measure of d converted into metres and offset by how far

                        the fingers held the ball below the fluid level.

        Velocity        = image21.pngimage22.png, instantaneous velocity

        Acceleration        =image23.pngimage22.png

        In this test, the averaging of the velocities went from frame 42;01, when the velocity became more constant.  It did suffer two major acceleration changes, at 42;06 and 42;08, possibly due to various sources of error which will be described later.  The average vt was calculated using equation 9 to be 0.0913 m/s2.

image24.png(9)

where: N        = number of values averaged.

        Ten tests were performed at the same temperature to determine a baseline average terminal velocity.  This average should not be confused with the average from each separate test.

Table 3 – Average Terminal Velocity at 17ºC

...read more.

Conclusion


Conclusion

        This experiment was designed to measure the terminal velocity of a solid ball falling through a column of glycerine at varying temperatures.  The resulting experimental data and calculation of vt revealed an outcome that verified published data.  The resulting relationship clearly supports my hypothesis.  Based on my research and published data, the terminal velocity of an object falling through a viscous fluid will vary according to the temperature of the fluid, dependent on a proportionality ofimage34.png.  I theorize that A and B are substance-specific constants, though I have not been able to support this through any research.  This seems to be the reciprocal of the Equation 8, asimage35.png.  Since I researched many different sources in the field of fluid mechanics, it is interesting to note the relative lack of research completed to conclude on a direct numerical relationship between temperature and viscosity.  

        There are several possible applications for data and conclusions of this experiment.  Since fluid temperatures usually vary, it would be helpful to know the precise terminal velocities of parachutists, so they would know when to deploy their parachutes, and for submarines, to calculate their dive angles.  As well, relating back to my original experimental idea, the re-entry of rockets and the thrust needed for them to break free of earth’s atmosphere can be predicted knowing their terminal velocity and the viscosity of air.  Precise, temperature-related terminal velocities can also be applied to other domains of science, such as the propagation of airborne diseases and the spread of pollen.


[1] Giancoli 256

[2] Giancoli 260

[3] Appendix A, Section - Buoyancy

[4] Ibid, Section - Drag

[5] Ibid, Section  - Viscosity

[6] http://hypertextbook.com/physics/matter/viscosity/

[7] Giancoli 353

[8] applied fluid mechanics ROY 10

[9] Adobe software

[10] Microsoft Excel Help – STDEV function

[11]Dow Glycerine =  http://www.dow.com/glycerine/resources/table18.htm

[12] MacDonald Pharmacy

[13] http://www.rpi.edu/dept/chem-eng/Biotech-Environ/SEDIMENT/sedsettle.html

...read more.

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our International Baccalaureate Physics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related International Baccalaureate Physics essays

  1. Physics-investigate the relationship of temperature and the height of the bounce of a squash ...

    1 27.2 2 26.5 3 25.4 For 40?C Attempt Height (cm) 1 29.3 2 30.1 3 29.1 For 45?C Attempt Height (cm) 1 34.7 2 33.4 3 32.5 For 50?C Attempt Height (cm) 1 38.0 2 37.7 3 37.3 For 55?C Attempt Height (cm)

  2. Research question: Part A : What is the static friction coefficient of ...

    ms-1 Acceleration, ms-2 Wood / wood 0.365 1.210 2.113 Wood / sand paper 0.200 0.875 0.844 Wood / glass 0.435 1.010 2.875 Determination of the kinetic coefficient; Block Mass (kg) Wood 0.33 Glass 0.38 e.g = = 0.3290 Surfaces Coefficient, Wood / wood 0.3290 Wood / sand paper 0.4780 Wood / glass 0.2390 Discussion & evaluation: 1.

  1. Bouncing balls. Research question: What is the relation between the height from which ...

    Table 6: Measurements for both phases of experiment. Height [�0.05 cm] Time squared [�0.1 s] Pioneer Dante floor table floor table 40.00 5.00 5.30 4.90 4.84 55.00 6.80 6.80 6.45 6.30 70.00 8.90 8.40 7.73 7.45 85.00 10.50 9.73 8.80 8.41 100.00 11.50 10.75 10.05 9.20 115.00 12.82 11.97 10.85

  2. Centripetal Force

    0.744 1.344086 1.806567 0.399702 -0.027055 0.0007320 7.00 0.700 1.428571 2.040816 0.451529 0.024772 0.0006136 7.32 0.732 1.366120 1.866284 0.412914 -0.013843 0.0001916 6.35 0.635 1.574803 2.480005 0.548700 0.121943

  1. The purpose of this lab is to examine impact craters. Impact craters occur when ...

    Finally, the experiment validates the hypothesis that energy would increase crater size since it shows true through 2 of the 3 examples, with the third acting as a different terrain.

  2. Bifilar Suspension - the technique will be applied to find the mass moment ...

    and the time period (T) * The line is not passing through origin (0,0) indicating the presence of systematic error in the investigation. * The graph is having a meaningful systematic error as line touches at y-intercept of -0.4065. * As the RMSE value is 0.2145 which is close to

  1. IB Physics Design Lab - Does the temperature a bar magnet is exposed to ...

    I will ensure that there are no electric or magnetic fields near the magnet while it is being tested. pH of Water Bath If the pH of the water is too acidic or alkaline, the water may react with the metal the magnet is made up of leading to small

  2. Investigation into the relationship between acceleration and the angle of free fall downhill

    0.029 The Table below shows the time taken for the cart to go downhill from the 5 experimental trials done for 5 different heights. The uncertainty in the length and height of the plane was taken to be the half of the smallest non-zero unit on the ruler used for measurement.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work